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Vector-borne diseases early warning system

By SANJOY RAY
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GUWAHATI, Sept 9 � The Assam Government, in a crucial development, is all set to give the go-ahead to the North East Space Application Centre (NESAC), based in Shillong, to adopt an early warning model on the outbreak of vector-borne diseases across the State.

The early warning system is expected to boost the preparedness of the State Government in addressing the health hazards caused by vector-borne diseases.

The NESAC, at the instance of the Assam Government, is already providing warnings for some select districts of upper Assam (pilot project), which has proved to be instrumental, said sources in the Health department.

Vector-borne diseases such as acute encephalitis symptoms (also includes JE), dengue and malaria had claimed nearly 300 lives in 2013, besides affecting thousands.

In the current calendar year (from January 1 to September 4), AES claimed 342 deaths, while malaria accounted for seven deaths.

The early warning module for the entire State vis-a-vis vector-borne diseases will take some time before it becomes fully operational. Once the system is fully operational, human suffering will be minimized to a great extent.

The NESAC is also providing early warning feedback to the State Disaster Management Authority on floods.

Dr S Sudhakar Rao, noted space research expert (NESAC) told this reporter over phone that the accuracy rate of the Centre has been quite commendable, both in case of flood and the vector-borne diseases (pilot project).

�The accuracy rate has been as high as 90 per cent. We are to develop the system further to be able to replicate the early warning model across the State,� Rao said.

A meeting of the space research experts and other stakeholders of the National Vector Borne Diseases Control Programme is soon going to discuss the road map of future, where induction of an early warning system will top the agenda.

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Vector-borne diseases early warning system

GUWAHATI, Sept 9 � The Assam Government, in a crucial development, is all set to give the go-ahead to the North East Space Application Centre (NESAC), based in Shillong, to adopt an early warning model on the outbreak of vector-borne diseases across the State.

The early warning system is expected to boost the preparedness of the State Government in addressing the health hazards caused by vector-borne diseases.

The NESAC, at the instance of the Assam Government, is already providing warnings for some select districts of upper Assam (pilot project), which has proved to be instrumental, said sources in the Health department.

Vector-borne diseases such as acute encephalitis symptoms (also includes JE), dengue and malaria had claimed nearly 300 lives in 2013, besides affecting thousands.

In the current calendar year (from January 1 to September 4), AES claimed 342 deaths, while malaria accounted for seven deaths.

The early warning module for the entire State vis-a-vis vector-borne diseases will take some time before it becomes fully operational. Once the system is fully operational, human suffering will be minimized to a great extent.

The NESAC is also providing early warning feedback to the State Disaster Management Authority on floods.

Dr S Sudhakar Rao, noted space research expert (NESAC) told this reporter over phone that the accuracy rate of the Centre has been quite commendable, both in case of flood and the vector-borne diseases (pilot project).

�The accuracy rate has been as high as 90 per cent. We are to develop the system further to be able to replicate the early warning model across the State,� Rao said.

A meeting of the space research experts and other stakeholders of the National Vector Borne Diseases Control Programme is soon going to discuss the road map of future, where induction of an early warning system will top the agenda.