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US Professor delivers talk on Marxist Humanism at GU

By The Assam Tribune
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GUWAHATI, June 9 - In the present-day capitalist society that reduces every aspect of human existence to commodified entities, the humanistic dimension of Marxism attempts to reassess certain traditional arguments of the school in the light of more specific concerns of the Third World like anti-black racism, xenophobia, economic inequalities and social discriminations.

This observation was made by Professor Peter Hudis at a special talk-cum-lecture entitled �Marxist Humanism with Special Reference to Frantz Fanon� organised by the Department of Modern Indian Languages and Literary Studies, Gauhati University in the seminar hall of the department today. Peter Hudis is professor of philosophy and humanities at the Oakton Community College in Illinois.

In the course of his lecture, Professor Hudis talked at length on various aspects of Marxist Humanism in the 21st century.

He focused on the writings of Frantz Fanon and attempted to trace the development of the psyche that generated anti-black racism across history from the sixteenth century onwards through the transatlantic slave trade in Europe. A crucial remark made by him in the course of his lecture was that it is rather racism that produces the idea of race at the first place. Therefore, racism becomes more of a social or economic category rather than physical. As such, from the perspective of Marxist Humanism as propounded by Fanon, this leads to the alienation of the non-white self in the face of denial of recognition by the white society leading to inferiority complex in the mind of the so-called �blacks� and thereby their propensity to mimic the �whites�.

Professor Hudis emphasised the importance of mutual recognition between races as imperative for social equality in the world. He further talked about the revolutionary nature of the writings of Frantz Fanon that not only discussed issues of colonialism and racism, but also attempted to delve into the psychological interiors of the non-white world.

The visiting Professor talked about the possibilities of developing and projecting a viable vision of an alternative to capitalism � a new human society � that can give due recognition to the present-day struggles for freedom and identity as well as create a humanist mode of production in society. He opined that breaking with the law of value is the necessary condition for the possibility of formation of a truly new society, as value production subordinates human beings to things and distorts human relations.

Attended by a number of faculty members and research scholars from various departments of GU and also other universities and institutions from across the city as well as by activists from various Marxist organisations and political parties, the talk was followed by an intense interactive session between Professor Hudis and the members of the audience over a range of issues.

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US Professor delivers talk on Marxist Humanism at GU

GUWAHATI, June 9 - In the present-day capitalist society that reduces every aspect of human existence to commodified entities, the humanistic dimension of Marxism attempts to reassess certain traditional arguments of the school in the light of more specific concerns of the Third World like anti-black racism, xenophobia, economic inequalities and social discriminations.

This observation was made by Professor Peter Hudis at a special talk-cum-lecture entitled �Marxist Humanism with Special Reference to Frantz Fanon� organised by the Department of Modern Indian Languages and Literary Studies, Gauhati University in the seminar hall of the department today. Peter Hudis is professor of philosophy and humanities at the Oakton Community College in Illinois.

In the course of his lecture, Professor Hudis talked at length on various aspects of Marxist Humanism in the 21st century.

He focused on the writings of Frantz Fanon and attempted to trace the development of the psyche that generated anti-black racism across history from the sixteenth century onwards through the transatlantic slave trade in Europe. A crucial remark made by him in the course of his lecture was that it is rather racism that produces the idea of race at the first place. Therefore, racism becomes more of a social or economic category rather than physical. As such, from the perspective of Marxist Humanism as propounded by Fanon, this leads to the alienation of the non-white self in the face of denial of recognition by the white society leading to inferiority complex in the mind of the so-called �blacks� and thereby their propensity to mimic the �whites�.

Professor Hudis emphasised the importance of mutual recognition between races as imperative for social equality in the world. He further talked about the revolutionary nature of the writings of Frantz Fanon that not only discussed issues of colonialism and racism, but also attempted to delve into the psychological interiors of the non-white world.

The visiting Professor talked about the possibilities of developing and projecting a viable vision of an alternative to capitalism � a new human society � that can give due recognition to the present-day struggles for freedom and identity as well as create a humanist mode of production in society. He opined that breaking with the law of value is the necessary condition for the possibility of formation of a truly new society, as value production subordinates human beings to things and distorts human relations.

Attended by a number of faculty members and research scholars from various departments of GU and also other universities and institutions from across the city as well as by activists from various Marxist organisations and political parties, the talk was followed by an intense interactive session between Professor Hudis and the members of the audience over a range of issues.

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