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Training imparted on bamboo propagation & vermicompost

By ANN Service
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JONAI, Sept 24 - The Jorhat-based Rain Forest Research Institute (RFRI) set up under the Indian Council of Forest Research and Education, in association with Jonai Forest Range Office (Dhemaji Forest Division), organised a skill development training on Vermicomposting, Nursery Management and Propagation of Bamboo at Jonai Town Club here recently.

Inaugurating the two-day training programme, RFRI scientist Rajeev Kumar Kalita explained the importance of forest conservation through sustainable development and participatory approach. He said that only Forest Department activities alone are not sufficient to protect and promote greenery, so it needs scientific guidance for its effective management.

Kalita, who later imparted training to the participants on bamboo propagation, cultivation and value addition, highlighted the economic importance of bamboo with special reference to its domestic use and commercial prospect.

According to him, bamboo is versatile green gold and is closely associated with our lives till death. He informed that about 7.5 million bamboo artisans depend on bamboo for their livelihood, while 2.5 billion people use it in their day-to-day lives.

The scientist during his presentation maintained that of the 1,250 bamboo species in the world, 136 species are found in India. As per survey in 2011, Assam has 36 species of bamboo, while other north-eastern States, including Arunachal Pradesh supports 20 to 50 species of bamboo in natural vegetation.

Stating that the soil of Assam is naturally suitable for bamboo cultivation, scientist Kalita suggested the farmers to select economically viable species. He also explained to them about treatment of bamboo before use in order to ensure their utility and sturdiness.

Imparting training on vermicomposting as organic fertiliser used for cultivation activities, another RFRI scientist R Bhattacharyya elaborated on preparation of low-cost bed for vermicompost and its management to produce organic manure. He explained to the farmers about its utility in cropping and commercial supply, while ACF from Jorhat, Matiur Rahman gave a presentation on bio-gas production and its usage.

During the technical session, ACF, BB Sandeep laid stress on conservation of greenery through Joint Forest Management (JFM) activities, while wildlife activist Prafulla Kaman spoke on �Man-animal Conflicts and its Scientific Management�.

There was a practical demonstration on preparation of vermicpompsting bed and its management for worm culture, on the concluding day.

A total of 30 farmers, including the president and secretaries of JFM and Eco Development Committees, besides the foresters attended the two-day training programme.

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Training imparted on bamboo propagation & vermicompost

JONAI, Sept 24 - The Jorhat-based Rain Forest Research Institute (RFRI) set up under the Indian Council of Forest Research and Education, in association with Jonai Forest Range Office (Dhemaji Forest Division), organised a skill development training on Vermicomposting, Nursery Management and Propagation of Bamboo at Jonai Town Club here recently.

Inaugurating the two-day training programme, RFRI scientist Rajeev Kumar Kalita explained the importance of forest conservation through sustainable development and participatory approach. He said that only Forest Department activities alone are not sufficient to protect and promote greenery, so it needs scientific guidance for its effective management.

Kalita, who later imparted training to the participants on bamboo propagation, cultivation and value addition, highlighted the economic importance of bamboo with special reference to its domestic use and commercial prospect.

According to him, bamboo is versatile green gold and is closely associated with our lives till death. He informed that about 7.5 million bamboo artisans depend on bamboo for their livelihood, while 2.5 billion people use it in their day-to-day lives.

The scientist during his presentation maintained that of the 1,250 bamboo species in the world, 136 species are found in India. As per survey in 2011, Assam has 36 species of bamboo, while other north-eastern States, including Arunachal Pradesh supports 20 to 50 species of bamboo in natural vegetation.

Stating that the soil of Assam is naturally suitable for bamboo cultivation, scientist Kalita suggested the farmers to select economically viable species. He also explained to them about treatment of bamboo before use in order to ensure their utility and sturdiness.

Imparting training on vermicomposting as organic fertiliser used for cultivation activities, another RFRI scientist R Bhattacharyya elaborated on preparation of low-cost bed for vermicompost and its management to produce organic manure. He explained to the farmers about its utility in cropping and commercial supply, while ACF from Jorhat, Matiur Rahman gave a presentation on bio-gas production and its usage.

During the technical session, ACF, BB Sandeep laid stress on conservation of greenery through Joint Forest Management (JFM) activities, while wildlife activist Prafulla Kaman spoke on �Man-animal Conflicts and its Scientific Management�.

There was a practical demonstration on preparation of vermicpompsting bed and its management for worm culture, on the concluding day.

A total of 30 farmers, including the president and secretaries of JFM and Eco Development Committees, besides the foresters attended the two-day training programme.

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