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Right to play

By Ronjoy Bordoloi
Right to play
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RONJOY BORDOLOI writes on the need for the fundamental right to physical literacy – identifying the intrinsic value of sports in life.

While turning the pages of The Assam Tribune, I came upon an article, "Supreme Court seeks opinion of Centre, States - Plea to make sports fundamental right", and it caught my attention immediately. The article states that the Supreme Court has sought the opinion of the Centre and the State governments on a suggestion that physical literacy or sports be recognised as a fundamental right and all education boards be asked to ensure at least 90 minutes of every school day to be dedicated to 'free play and games'.

Hereby, I would like to extend my full support to the recommendation as it has become immensely essential at a time when mobile phones, tablets, television sets, computers, etc., have taken over our lives, especially of the younger generation which has become stringent couch potatoes rather than being curious and intent in exploring the wonderful world of Nature and reality.

Real-time experience and knowledge is gained only when they step out from their virtual rooms and just play, in the process enhancing social skills and cultivating a sense of wonder, so vital for human development. The same was also pointed out by the judges who stressed upon the importance of physical activities and sports, which is more useful and durable than spending time on screen.

Moreover, such addiction to mobile phones, etc., adversely affect the health of children as well as adults. Nowadays, people prefer long periods of idleness instead of gaining physical endurance and stamina. The result is a set of obese, disease-ridden individuals engaged in video games and social media, sacrificing the real world for virtual satisfaction!

And undoubtedly, mobile phones and television, etc., are imperative when it comes to attaining and imparting knowledge and other constructive, productive activities, however, they are doing more harm than healing as of now with their harmful radiation and irreversible addiction. Throughout the years, the immune systems of children and even adults have undergone a lot due to extensive changes in lifestyle. The trend has also reached the rural households, with the advent of superior agricultural technology requiring less work and lesser physical energy.

Furthermore, it is also pertinent to mention that physical activity is very helpful in getting jobs (specifically in the Armed Forces) and if it is made into a right, sports can become a career option for people who are good at it. Undeniably, sports has never been given proper reception, with parents wanting their children to study well and get a job somehow, but not through sports. Making sports a fundamental right will go a long way in making children take up sports as a career choice and improve poor performance in many championships, including the Olympics.

Physical activity is necessary for a longer and healthier life. It is an important ingredient for our biological mechanism to sustain itself and give us life and vigour from within. It is a lifetime choice and responsibility of each individual and also of the nation, at large. And every person has a right to sustain himself physically as he has the right to live.

Besides, the overwhelming rise of lifestyle diseases like obesity, diabetes, heart problems, metabolic syndrome, cancer, destructive pulmonary diseases, etc., are mainly due to physical inactivity, unhealthy diet and substance addiction. And knowledge of these illnesses, their related medical hazards, along with a warning of future economic burden they entail and other connected topics should be imparted at a very early age, so that the children can restrain themselves early on and become aware of their own good health and surroundings, resulting in a healthy and wealthy nation.

In Assam, these suggestions, if materialised, will go a long way in providing opportunities to the talent pool the State has, which is still untapped to a large extent due to insufficient infrastructure, bias, lobbyism and corruption to name a few. The State has immense potential when it comes to sports but the lack of adequate exposure has plagued the players and this right may help many talented sportspersons to find a platform to make their voices heard.

([email protected])

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Right to play

RONJOY BORDOLOI writes on the need for the fundamental right to physical literacy – identifying the intrinsic value of sports in life.

While turning the pages of The Assam Tribune, I came upon an article, "Supreme Court seeks opinion of Centre, States - Plea to make sports fundamental right", and it caught my attention immediately. The article states that the Supreme Court has sought the opinion of the Centre and the State governments on a suggestion that physical literacy or sports be recognised as a fundamental right and all education boards be asked to ensure at least 90 minutes of every school day to be dedicated to 'free play and games'.

Hereby, I would like to extend my full support to the recommendation as it has become immensely essential at a time when mobile phones, tablets, television sets, computers, etc., have taken over our lives, especially of the younger generation which has become stringent couch potatoes rather than being curious and intent in exploring the wonderful world of Nature and reality.

Real-time experience and knowledge is gained only when they step out from their virtual rooms and just play, in the process enhancing social skills and cultivating a sense of wonder, so vital for human development. The same was also pointed out by the judges who stressed upon the importance of physical activities and sports, which is more useful and durable than spending time on screen.

Moreover, such addiction to mobile phones, etc., adversely affect the health of children as well as adults. Nowadays, people prefer long periods of idleness instead of gaining physical endurance and stamina. The result is a set of obese, disease-ridden individuals engaged in video games and social media, sacrificing the real world for virtual satisfaction!

And undoubtedly, mobile phones and television, etc., are imperative when it comes to attaining and imparting knowledge and other constructive, productive activities, however, they are doing more harm than healing as of now with their harmful radiation and irreversible addiction. Throughout the years, the immune systems of children and even adults have undergone a lot due to extensive changes in lifestyle. The trend has also reached the rural households, with the advent of superior agricultural technology requiring less work and lesser physical energy.

Furthermore, it is also pertinent to mention that physical activity is very helpful in getting jobs (specifically in the Armed Forces) and if it is made into a right, sports can become a career option for people who are good at it. Undeniably, sports has never been given proper reception, with parents wanting their children to study well and get a job somehow, but not through sports. Making sports a fundamental right will go a long way in making children take up sports as a career choice and improve poor performance in many championships, including the Olympics.

Physical activity is necessary for a longer and healthier life. It is an important ingredient for our biological mechanism to sustain itself and give us life and vigour from within. It is a lifetime choice and responsibility of each individual and also of the nation, at large. And every person has a right to sustain himself physically as he has the right to live.

Besides, the overwhelming rise of lifestyle diseases like obesity, diabetes, heart problems, metabolic syndrome, cancer, destructive pulmonary diseases, etc., are mainly due to physical inactivity, unhealthy diet and substance addiction. And knowledge of these illnesses, their related medical hazards, along with a warning of future economic burden they entail and other connected topics should be imparted at a very early age, so that the children can restrain themselves early on and become aware of their own good health and surroundings, resulting in a healthy and wealthy nation.

In Assam, these suggestions, if materialised, will go a long way in providing opportunities to the talent pool the State has, which is still untapped to a large extent due to insufficient infrastructure, bias, lobbyism and corruption to name a few. The State has immense potential when it comes to sports but the lack of adequate exposure has plagued the players and this right may help many talented sportspersons to find a platform to make their voices heard.

([email protected])