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Students urged to rid society of false beliefs

By Correspondent
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TEZPUR, Sept 16 � �Development in the thinking of human beings has become possible only because of the progress in science and technology.� This was stated by the president of Tezpur Sahitya Sabha and retired professor, Dr Suresh Kumar Arya while speaking at the closing ceremony of the two-day-long science model exhibition programme held here at the Rastra Bhasha School. The exhibition was organised by the office of the Inspector of Schools, Sonitpur district.

Enthralled by the science model exhibition put up by 154 students from different schools of Sonitpur district, Dr Arya said that for every good work done, along with talent, inspiration plays a pivotal role and this inspiration seems to have been provided to the students by the science teachers in the present day academic environment. �Models displayed in the exhibition are examples of such work,� he said and added that the history of science is the study of the historical development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural sciences and social sciences. �From the 18th century through the late 20th century, the history of science, especially of the physical and biological sciences, was often presented in a progressive narrative in which true theories replaced false beliefs. More recent historical interpretations, such as those of Thomas Kuhn, tend to portray the history of science in more nuanced terms, such as that of competing paradigms or conceptual systems in a wider matrix that includes intellectual, cultural, economic and political themes outside of science,� he said.

Urging the student community to get involved in building a �false belief-free society� he in his long discourse further stated that the Scientific Revolution established science as a source for the growth of knowledge. During the 19th century, the practice of science became professionalised and institutionalised in ways that continued through the 20th century. As the role of scientific knowledge grew in society, it became incorporated with many aspects of the functioning of nation-states. �The history of science is marked by a chain of advances in technology and knowledge that have always complemented each other. Technological innovations bring about new discoveries and are bred by other discoveries, which inspire new possibilities and approaches to long-standing science issues.

He further said that the Scientific Revolution is a convenient boundary between ancient thought and classical physics. �Nicolaus Copernicus revived the heliocentric model of the solar system described by Aristarchus of Samos. This was followed by the first known model of planetary motion given by Kepler in the early 17th century, which proposed that the planets follow elliptical orbits, with the Sun at one focus of the ellipse. Galileo (�Father of Modern Physics�) also made use of experiments to validate physical theories, a key element of the scientific method.� Dr Arya stated. �In 1687, Isaac Newton published the Principia Mathematica, detailing two comprehensive and successful physical theories: Newton's laws of motion, which led to classical mechanics; and Newton's Law of Gravitation, which describes the fundamental force of gravity. The behaviour of electricity and magnetism was studied by Faraday, Ohm, and others during the early 19th century. These studies led to the unification of the two phenomena into a single theory of electromagnetism, by James Clerk Maxwell,� he said.

Among the models exhibited from different schools by the students were �Power supply from free energy� by Prishni Khanikar of Bihaguri Sankardeva Jatya Vidiyalaya, �Medicinal plants for rural area� by Khusbu Khatun of Bindukuri High School, �Intelligent Helmet� by Pinku Gupta of Devendra Green Grove English School, Dhekiajuli, �Time Light� by Israfil Ansari of Tezpur Rastra Bhasha School, �Indigenous air-cooler� by Jadav Sanjel of Silikhabari Higher Secondary School, �Low cost water purification� by Pakhi Priom of Tezpur Gurukul Vidiyalaya and �Cell phone based irrigation system� by Niki Tohbildar of Assam Valley school. These models have been selected for the State-level competition. Dr Semanta Mani Hazarika, Asstt Professor of the Department of Chemistry, Darrang College, Dr Palashmani Saikia, and Syamolima Chowdhury of the Department of Physics, Darrang College were present as judges who also interacted with participating students.

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Students urged to rid society of false beliefs

TEZPUR, Sept 16 � �Development in the thinking of human beings has become possible only because of the progress in science and technology.� This was stated by the president of Tezpur Sahitya Sabha and retired professor, Dr Suresh Kumar Arya while speaking at the closing ceremony of the two-day-long science model exhibition programme held here at the Rastra Bhasha School. The exhibition was organised by the office of the Inspector of Schools, Sonitpur district.

Enthralled by the science model exhibition put up by 154 students from different schools of Sonitpur district, Dr Arya said that for every good work done, along with talent, inspiration plays a pivotal role and this inspiration seems to have been provided to the students by the science teachers in the present day academic environment. �Models displayed in the exhibition are examples of such work,� he said and added that the history of science is the study of the historical development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural sciences and social sciences. �From the 18th century through the late 20th century, the history of science, especially of the physical and biological sciences, was often presented in a progressive narrative in which true theories replaced false beliefs. More recent historical interpretations, such as those of Thomas Kuhn, tend to portray the history of science in more nuanced terms, such as that of competing paradigms or conceptual systems in a wider matrix that includes intellectual, cultural, economic and political themes outside of science,� he said.

Urging the student community to get involved in building a �false belief-free society� he in his long discourse further stated that the Scientific Revolution established science as a source for the growth of knowledge. During the 19th century, the practice of science became professionalised and institutionalised in ways that continued through the 20th century. As the role of scientific knowledge grew in society, it became incorporated with many aspects of the functioning of nation-states. �The history of science is marked by a chain of advances in technology and knowledge that have always complemented each other. Technological innovations bring about new discoveries and are bred by other discoveries, which inspire new possibilities and approaches to long-standing science issues.

He further said that the Scientific Revolution is a convenient boundary between ancient thought and classical physics. �Nicolaus Copernicus revived the heliocentric model of the solar system described by Aristarchus of Samos. This was followed by the first known model of planetary motion given by Kepler in the early 17th century, which proposed that the planets follow elliptical orbits, with the Sun at one focus of the ellipse. Galileo (�Father of Modern Physics�) also made use of experiments to validate physical theories, a key element of the scientific method.� Dr Arya stated. �In 1687, Isaac Newton published the Principia Mathematica, detailing two comprehensive and successful physical theories: Newton's laws of motion, which led to classical mechanics; and Newton's Law of Gravitation, which describes the fundamental force of gravity. The behaviour of electricity and magnetism was studied by Faraday, Ohm, and others during the early 19th century. These studies led to the unification of the two phenomena into a single theory of electromagnetism, by James Clerk Maxwell,� he said.

Among the models exhibited from different schools by the students were �Power supply from free energy� by Prishni Khanikar of Bihaguri Sankardeva Jatya Vidiyalaya, �Medicinal plants for rural area� by Khusbu Khatun of Bindukuri High School, �Intelligent Helmet� by Pinku Gupta of Devendra Green Grove English School, Dhekiajuli, �Time Light� by Israfil Ansari of Tezpur Rastra Bhasha School, �Indigenous air-cooler� by Jadav Sanjel of Silikhabari Higher Secondary School, �Low cost water purification� by Pakhi Priom of Tezpur Gurukul Vidiyalaya and �Cell phone based irrigation system� by Niki Tohbildar of Assam Valley school. These models have been selected for the State-level competition. Dr Semanta Mani Hazarika, Asstt Professor of the Department of Chemistry, Darrang College, Dr Palashmani Saikia, and Syamolima Chowdhury of the Department of Physics, Darrang College were present as judges who also interacted with participating students.