Begin typing your search above and press return to search.

State facing shortage of science teachers

By Staff reporter

GUWAHATI, Oct 16 � Assam is likely to face a severe shortage of science teachers in the next few years if immediate interventions are not made. The number of science graduates has not risen to the required extent, and many schools and colleges are beginning to feel the effect.

The situation is more pronounced in remote areas and in regions inhabited by indigenous communities. In those areas, the number of science graduates and post-graduates is limited, which translates into fewer teachers in schools and colleges.

Even as the importance of science education is being emphasised by various quarters, students in adequate numbers are not choosing it in higher secondary level. Consequently, science education has failed to take off in the state to the desired level.

In 2010, only 2,042 students took the TDC final examination in Science stream under Gauhati University, whereas 22,312 students took their examination in the Arts stream. The number of candidates in the Commerce stream was also more than that in the Science stream.

The situation did not improve this year, in which 2,130 candidates took the TDC final year exams under Gauhati University. In the same year, 27,644 candidates in the Arts stream appeared for the examination, while 4,016 appeared in the Commerce stream.

A senior teacher of Cotton College, who preferred not to be named, was of the view that the situation is serious and worsening. �Less awareness in society coupled with failure in promoting science education has led to this state of affairs�we are heading for a crisis in the next five to ten years if the situation does not improve,� he remarked.

Next Story
Similar Posts

— Dalai Lama(THIS IS STATIC)

State facing shortage of science teachers

GUWAHATI, Oct 16 � Assam is likely to face a severe shortage of science teachers in the next few years if immediate interventions are not made. The number of science graduates has not risen to the required extent, and many schools and colleges are beginning to feel the effect.

The situation is more pronounced in remote areas and in regions inhabited by indigenous communities. In those areas, the number of science graduates and post-graduates is limited, which translates into fewer teachers in schools and colleges.

Even as the importance of science education is being emphasised by various quarters, students in adequate numbers are not choosing it in higher secondary level. Consequently, science education has failed to take off in the state to the desired level.

In 2010, only 2,042 students took the TDC final examination in Science stream under Gauhati University, whereas 22,312 students took their examination in the Arts stream. The number of candidates in the Commerce stream was also more than that in the Science stream.

The situation did not improve this year, in which 2,130 candidates took the TDC final year exams under Gauhati University. In the same year, 27,644 candidates in the Arts stream appeared for the examination, while 4,016 appeared in the Commerce stream.

A senior teacher of Cotton College, who preferred not to be named, was of the view that the situation is serious and worsening. �Less awareness in society coupled with failure in promoting science education has led to this state of affairs�we are heading for a crisis in the next five to ten years if the situation does not improve,� he remarked.

Similar Posts

— Dalai Lama(THIS IS STATIC)