Top
Begin typing your search above and press return to search.

Shad Suk Mynsiem celebrated

By Correspondent
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print

SHILLONG, April 10 - The annual thanksgiving festival, Shad Suk Mynsiem was today celebrated at the Weiking Grounds here with thousands of people, musicians and dancers dressed in their finest attire participating in this colourful festival with gaiety.

This festival of the indigenous Khasi tribe is celebrated each year during the month of April after priests invoke the Almighty for his blessings. Young men, women and children alike took part in the dance in their exquisite traditional costumes.

Sumar Sing Sawian, an elder of the Seng Khasi, said, �Today is the celebration of Spring season , the coming of spring season which we call Shad Suk Mynsiem , it means the dance of peaceful and joyful heart.� He also said, �In this season nature displays colour everywhere, this gives joy to our heart.�

According to records, Shad Suk Mynsiem (dance of the happy hearts) was first celebrated on April 14 and 15,1911 at Weiking Ground at Mawkhar, Shillong. Ever since, the dance has been an annual ritual.

�The Shad Suk Mynsiem is one such celebration to show the community�s admiration for God. It is organised throughout the Khasi Hills during spring time when nature rejuvenates itself and mankind is filled with the hope of a rich harvest from the sown seeds,� added Sawian.

The dance is part of the Seng Khasi�s objective to further the ancient socio-religious cultural heritage of the Khasi people.

During the dance, women dancers wear Jainpien � a piece of cloth tied around the waist. A velvet blouse called Mukmor and a sarong-like garment called Jainsem. Gold and silver necklaces together with bracelets and armlets are the ornaments worn by them.

There are six different modes of dances in Shad Suk Mynsiem. These are Shad Nalai, Dum Dum, Klang, Padiah, Pyllun and Mastieh. These dances continue till sunset to the melody of the drum (Ksing and Nakra Bom) beats and the Tangmuri (flute).

More in Entertainment
Next Story
Similar Posts
Shad Suk Mynsiem celebrated

SHILLONG, April 10 - The annual thanksgiving festival, Shad Suk Mynsiem was today celebrated at the Weiking Grounds here with thousands of people, musicians and dancers dressed in their finest attire participating in this colourful festival with gaiety.

This festival of the indigenous Khasi tribe is celebrated each year during the month of April after priests invoke the Almighty for his blessings. Young men, women and children alike took part in the dance in their exquisite traditional costumes.

Sumar Sing Sawian, an elder of the Seng Khasi, said, �Today is the celebration of Spring season , the coming of spring season which we call Shad Suk Mynsiem , it means the dance of peaceful and joyful heart.� He also said, �In this season nature displays colour everywhere, this gives joy to our heart.�

According to records, Shad Suk Mynsiem (dance of the happy hearts) was first celebrated on April 14 and 15,1911 at Weiking Ground at Mawkhar, Shillong. Ever since, the dance has been an annual ritual.

�The Shad Suk Mynsiem is one such celebration to show the community�s admiration for God. It is organised throughout the Khasi Hills during spring time when nature rejuvenates itself and mankind is filled with the hope of a rich harvest from the sown seeds,� added Sawian.

The dance is part of the Seng Khasi�s objective to further the ancient socio-religious cultural heritage of the Khasi people.

During the dance, women dancers wear Jainpien � a piece of cloth tied around the waist. A velvet blouse called Mukmor and a sarong-like garment called Jainsem. Gold and silver necklaces together with bracelets and armlets are the ornaments worn by them.

There are six different modes of dances in Shad Suk Mynsiem. These are Shad Nalai, Dum Dum, Klang, Padiah, Pyllun and Mastieh. These dances continue till sunset to the melody of the drum (Ksing and Nakra Bom) beats and the Tangmuri (flute).

More in Entertainment
Similar Posts