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Sanitary napkin vending machine installed

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HAILAKANDI, March 19 - As part of its ongoing clean water and proper sanitation month, Rotary Club of Hailakandi installed a sanitary napkin vending machine at Srikrishan Sarda College in Hailakandi on Tuesday probably for the first time in the district for the benefit of girl students. Similar machines will also be installed at the Women�s college and other educational institutions of the district where girl students study, said the secretary of Rotary Club, Sankar Choudhury.

In rural India, roughly one in two girls still believes that menstruation is a kind of disease. The majority of adolescent girls know very little about menstruation and how to deal with it. Menstrual hygiene leaves much to be desired in rural India, with sanitary pads being largely unavailable.

The vending machine was inaugurated by the honorary member of Rotary Club of Hailakandi, Keerthi Jalli where gynaecologist Monika Deb addressed the girl students regarding health and menstrual hygiene. In the welcome address, the president of the club, Harkishore Chanda briefed the purpose of the installation of the sanitary napkin vending machine that menstrual hygiene is one of the most important matters of a girl�s life which remains neglected. Health issues in the remote villages and all reproductive diseases are caused by poor menstrual hygiene, he added.

Moreover he added that limited access to information, as well as cultural taboos and social stigmas attached to menstruation have a negative impact on the lives and health of millions of girls and women in India. It is a taboo subject, surrounded by silence and shame that also restricts women�s access to normal activities and services. Many girls and women miss school and work every month because they do not have access to sanitary pads.

He has also emphasised that distribution of low-cost subsidised sanitary pads to rural women and girls and raise awareness about the importance good menstrual and personal health practices in local schools and villages will create a positive impact on women�s health and hygiene.

The Deputy Commissioner asked the girl students to attempt for a bright future before taking any other decision in life. She has also asked the students to maintain proper menstrual hygiene.

In this programme, the principal of the college BC Pradhan extended his cooperation. Samiran Paul, Debasish Guhathakurata, Kamal Hussain Choudhury and the members of Women cell along with the teachers of the college were also present.

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Sanitary napkin vending machine installed

HAILAKANDI, March 19 - As part of its ongoing clean water and proper sanitation month, Rotary Club of Hailakandi installed a sanitary napkin vending machine at Srikrishan Sarda College in Hailakandi on Tuesday probably for the first time in the district for the benefit of girl students. Similar machines will also be installed at the Women�s college and other educational institutions of the district where girl students study, said the secretary of Rotary Club, Sankar Choudhury.

In rural India, roughly one in two girls still believes that menstruation is a kind of disease. The majority of adolescent girls know very little about menstruation and how to deal with it. Menstrual hygiene leaves much to be desired in rural India, with sanitary pads being largely unavailable.

The vending machine was inaugurated by the honorary member of Rotary Club of Hailakandi, Keerthi Jalli where gynaecologist Monika Deb addressed the girl students regarding health and menstrual hygiene. In the welcome address, the president of the club, Harkishore Chanda briefed the purpose of the installation of the sanitary napkin vending machine that menstrual hygiene is one of the most important matters of a girl�s life which remains neglected. Health issues in the remote villages and all reproductive diseases are caused by poor menstrual hygiene, he added.

Moreover he added that limited access to information, as well as cultural taboos and social stigmas attached to menstruation have a negative impact on the lives and health of millions of girls and women in India. It is a taboo subject, surrounded by silence and shame that also restricts women�s access to normal activities and services. Many girls and women miss school and work every month because they do not have access to sanitary pads.

He has also emphasised that distribution of low-cost subsidised sanitary pads to rural women and girls and raise awareness about the importance good menstrual and personal health practices in local schools and villages will create a positive impact on women�s health and hygiene.

The Deputy Commissioner asked the girl students to attempt for a bright future before taking any other decision in life. She has also asked the students to maintain proper menstrual hygiene.

In this programme, the principal of the college BC Pradhan extended his cooperation. Samiran Paul, Debasish Guhathakurata, Kamal Hussain Choudhury and the members of Women cell along with the teachers of the college were also present.