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Rekha Baruah�s Jugma Matrir Sowad released

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GUWAHATI, April 4 � Jugma Matrir Sowad, an autobiographical volume by writer Rekha Baruah chronicling varied events and anecdotes of her family life and dedicated to the memory of her aunt and mother, was released today.

Dr Anil Ranjan Barthakur formally released the book at a function held at a city hotel. The programme was anchored by senior journalist Indrani Raimedhi.

Releasing the book, Dr Barthakur lauded the author for the vivid and powerful portrayal of a family life of a bygone era � an age where family bonding used to be enduring and which invariably left a profound impact on shaping the personalities of the young members of the family.

He added that the book would help the readers realise the worth of supportive and cohesive family lives in an increasingly consumerist world where age-old values were fast diminishing.

The author, in her address, recalled her days at the Chenijan Tea Estate in Jorhat in a close-knit family. �We were lucky to have spent a considerable part of our lives in a family that was blessed by two mothers � one my biological mother, Sushila Devi, and the other being my Barma (aunt), Shakuntala Devi, who I consider to be even greater than my own mother. This is because Barma�s influence on us children was more profound,� she said.

Lahori Barthakur and Uma Devi also shared the dais.

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Rekha Baruah�s Jugma Matrir Sowad released

GUWAHATI, April 4 � Jugma Matrir Sowad, an autobiographical volume by writer Rekha Baruah chronicling varied events and anecdotes of her family life and dedicated to the memory of her aunt and mother, was released today.

Dr Anil Ranjan Barthakur formally released the book at a function held at a city hotel. The programme was anchored by senior journalist Indrani Raimedhi.

Releasing the book, Dr Barthakur lauded the author for the vivid and powerful portrayal of a family life of a bygone era � an age where family bonding used to be enduring and which invariably left a profound impact on shaping the personalities of the young members of the family.

He added that the book would help the readers realise the worth of supportive and cohesive family lives in an increasingly consumerist world where age-old values were fast diminishing.

The author, in her address, recalled her days at the Chenijan Tea Estate in Jorhat in a close-knit family. �We were lucky to have spent a considerable part of our lives in a family that was blessed by two mothers � one my biological mother, Sushila Devi, and the other being my Barma (aunt), Shakuntala Devi, who I consider to be even greater than my own mother. This is because Barma�s influence on us children was more profound,� she said.

Lahori Barthakur and Uma Devi also shared the dais.