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National Book Trust to take NE folk tales to global stage

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GUWAHATI, Aug 8 - National Book Trust (NBT), India, will give special emphasis to bring the languages, folk tales and traditions of communities from the north-eastern region to the global platform and also focus on reviving the literature of languages which are facing extinction.

Speaking to reporters here today, NBT Director Dr Rita Chowdhury said the north-eastern region had a unique identity within the greater Indian society and the Central government and the Human Resources Development Ministry were giving special interest to the region.

Dr Chowdhury, appointed last month as Director of NBT, said that there was ample scope to take the culture, literature and heritage of various communities of the North-east to the global stage.

�The North-east has a diversity of languages and cultures. NBT has a separate fund for the North-east. With its well-structured organisation, NBT has ample scope to undertake various projects. There should be a unified movement in the North-east to promote the region�s culture and literature,� she said.

Dr Chowdhury said NBT was looking to cover all languages of the North-east. �There are many languages and communities in the North-east which have not received proper focus. We are giving importance to them to save the languages and heritage of all the communities. Special focus will be given to languages facing extinction,� the NBT Director said.

She said efforts to cover the folk takes and oral traditions of various communities would be the priority of NBT. �In this regard, NBT will soon publish books of folk tales of the Koch Rajbongshi and tea tribe communities. We will then expand to include similar works of all other communities of the North-east as well as other parts of India,� Chowdhury said.

NBT is also looking to publish translated works of famous writers of yesteryear of Assam.

�We are also aiming to reach out to areas in the periphery to promote reading habits. With this view in mind we will organise book fairs in smaller towns and in this regard a book fair will be held at Goalpara later this year,� she said, adding that NBT was also looking to promote reading clubs with a view to connecting to the people with books.

NBT has also started a special project to promote and encourage young writers.

In addition, a North East Study Series for promoting books and writers from the region has been recently started and biographical sketches of some renowned Assamese writers of the past and present times will be published soon.

A proposal is also under consideration to have a separate North East Corner at the New Delhi World Book Fair scheduled for January 2016 at Pragati Maidan in the national capital.

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National Book Trust to take NE folk tales to global stage

GUWAHATI, Aug 8 - National Book Trust (NBT), India, will give special emphasis to bring the languages, folk tales and traditions of communities from the north-eastern region to the global platform and also focus on reviving the literature of languages which are facing extinction.

Speaking to reporters here today, NBT Director Dr Rita Chowdhury said the north-eastern region had a unique identity within the greater Indian society and the Central government and the Human Resources Development Ministry were giving special interest to the region.

Dr Chowdhury, appointed last month as Director of NBT, said that there was ample scope to take the culture, literature and heritage of various communities of the North-east to the global stage.

�The North-east has a diversity of languages and cultures. NBT has a separate fund for the North-east. With its well-structured organisation, NBT has ample scope to undertake various projects. There should be a unified movement in the North-east to promote the region�s culture and literature,� she said.

Dr Chowdhury said NBT was looking to cover all languages of the North-east. �There are many languages and communities in the North-east which have not received proper focus. We are giving importance to them to save the languages and heritage of all the communities. Special focus will be given to languages facing extinction,� the NBT Director said.

She said efforts to cover the folk takes and oral traditions of various communities would be the priority of NBT. �In this regard, NBT will soon publish books of folk tales of the Koch Rajbongshi and tea tribe communities. We will then expand to include similar works of all other communities of the North-east as well as other parts of India,� Chowdhury said.

NBT is also looking to publish translated works of famous writers of yesteryear of Assam.

�We are also aiming to reach out to areas in the periphery to promote reading habits. With this view in mind we will organise book fairs in smaller towns and in this regard a book fair will be held at Goalpara later this year,� she said, adding that NBT was also looking to promote reading clubs with a view to connecting to the people with books.

NBT has also started a special project to promote and encourage young writers.

In addition, a North East Study Series for promoting books and writers from the region has been recently started and biographical sketches of some renowned Assamese writers of the past and present times will be published soon.

A proposal is also under consideration to have a separate North East Corner at the New Delhi World Book Fair scheduled for January 2016 at Pragati Maidan in the national capital.