Begin typing your search above and press return to search.

Murray doesn�t regret supporting Scotland

By The Assam Tribune
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo

LONDON, Sept 23 (IANS/EFE): Scottish tennis champ Andy Murray has said he does not �regret giving an opinion� and voicing his support for Scotland�s independence on Twitter shortly before last Thursday�s referendum.

In statements on Tuesday to the BBC, the tennis player said everyone should be allowed an opinion, although he admitted he should probably have expressed it in a different way.

Shortly before polls opened last Thursday in Scotland for the referendum on independence, Murray declared his support for the �yes� campaign, saying �Let�s do it!� in a tweet which was widely criticised on the social networking service.

�It was a very emotional day for Scottish people and the whole country and the whole of the UK � it was a big day,� Murray told the BBC in China, in an interview in which he added he now wanted to �move on� and focus on playing tennis.

The tennis star, who won the Wimbledon tournament in 2013, had remained unbiased in the debate over independence but broke his silence on Twitter just before the vote, in which Scots decided to remain in the United Kingdom by a 10-point margin.

Despite his support for the �yes� campaign, Murray could not vote because he does not live in Scotland.

Next Story
Similar Posts
Murray doesn�t regret supporting Scotland

LONDON, Sept 23 (IANS/EFE): Scottish tennis champ Andy Murray has said he does not �regret giving an opinion� and voicing his support for Scotland�s independence on Twitter shortly before last Thursday�s referendum.

In statements on Tuesday to the BBC, the tennis player said everyone should be allowed an opinion, although he admitted he should probably have expressed it in a different way.

Shortly before polls opened last Thursday in Scotland for the referendum on independence, Murray declared his support for the �yes� campaign, saying �Let�s do it!� in a tweet which was widely criticised on the social networking service.

�It was a very emotional day for Scottish people and the whole country and the whole of the UK � it was a big day,� Murray told the BBC in China, in an interview in which he added he now wanted to �move on� and focus on playing tennis.

The tennis star, who won the Wimbledon tournament in 2013, had remained unbiased in the debate over independence but broke his silence on Twitter just before the vote, in which Scots decided to remain in the United Kingdom by a 10-point margin.

Despite his support for the �yes� campaign, Murray could not vote because he does not live in Scotland.