Begin typing your search above and press return to search.

Majesty of Assamese mystic poetry discussed

By Staff Reporter
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo

GUWAHATI, Aug 23 - A discussion on �Mysticism in Assamese literature and influence of folk songs and folk tales on the growth of Assamese poetry� was held at the 222nd sitting of the Brihattar Panjabari Sahitya Sabha (BPSS) a few days back, with veteran journalist DN Chakravartty in the chair.

Initiating the discussion on mysticism, poet and short-story writer Bimal Kumar Hazarika said that like all the mystic poets of the world, Assamese mystic poets also sang and glorified the existence of a great all-encompassing power guiding the destiny of all creations.

�The mystic poets rely fully on the supreme power of the invisible creator of the universe,� he observed. Tracing the origin of mysticism in India, Hazarika said that right from the days of the Upanishads, the Indian thinking got manifested through mystic poetry both in Sanskrit and different languages of the country.

�While the poetry of Rabindranath was one of the finest manifestations of Indian mystic poetry, Hindi literature was also immensely enriched by great mystic poets like Mahadevi Varma,� he said, adding that mysticism in Assamese poetry made its journey from the writings of Lakshminath Bezbaroa, Chandrakumar Agarwala, Ambikagiri Roychoudhury and Nalinibala Devi.

Elaborating on the majesty of Assamese mystic poetry, Hazarika referred to the monumental contributions of mystic poets like Raghunath Choudhury, Durgeswar Sarma, Ananda Chandra Agarwala, Dharmeswari Devi Baruani, Nilamoni Phukan (�Koka�), Dibya Prabha Bharali, Dimbeswar Neog and Sailadhar Rajkhowa.

In his illuminating discourse, Anis-uz-Zaman, president of the Assam Kavi Samaj, said that Assamese poetry had its fountain spring in the folk songs dating back to the pre-Christian era.

�Just like the Brahmaputra enriches the rivers and rivulets in the State, it was the folk songs and folk music that work like a soul sustaining the growth and existence of modern Assamese poetry. The Bihu songs and the zikirs also exercise tremendous influence on the shaping of the entire Assamese poetry,� he said.

Mahendra Bora, retired chief librarian of the Tezpur University, and also the convener of the meeting, welcomed the guests and introduced the members of the family.

Dr Surendra Mohan Mahanta, Mira Das and Urmila Kalita presented folk songs, while Bhanu Deka, Mafizuddin Ahmed, Anjali Hazarika, Deba Prasad Talukdar, Azida Ahmed, Pratul Sarma, Syeda Majani Ahmed and Sobha Khanikar recited self-composed poems. Ruma Rajkhowa, Jivan Chandra Goswami and Lilakanta Bora read out short stories.

Rajib Ahmed, who was awarded literary pension this year, was felicitated in the meeting.

Madhuri Bhuyan Kalita, secretary of Alochana Chakra, read out the proceedings of the last meeting, while Dr Chandraprabha Das reviewed the poems, short stories and essays read out in the last meeting.

DN Chakravartty, in his presidential remarks, said that the aim of an ideal literature was to bring forth the divinity latent in the human heart. �It is literature that can inspire even the humble person to make the supreme sacrifice for the cause of one�s country and mankind,� he said.

Next Story
Similar Posts
Majesty of Assamese mystic poetry discussed

GUWAHATI, Aug 23 - A discussion on �Mysticism in Assamese literature and influence of folk songs and folk tales on the growth of Assamese poetry� was held at the 222nd sitting of the Brihattar Panjabari Sahitya Sabha (BPSS) a few days back, with veteran journalist DN Chakravartty in the chair.

Initiating the discussion on mysticism, poet and short-story writer Bimal Kumar Hazarika said that like all the mystic poets of the world, Assamese mystic poets also sang and glorified the existence of a great all-encompassing power guiding the destiny of all creations.

�The mystic poets rely fully on the supreme power of the invisible creator of the universe,� he observed. Tracing the origin of mysticism in India, Hazarika said that right from the days of the Upanishads, the Indian thinking got manifested through mystic poetry both in Sanskrit and different languages of the country.

�While the poetry of Rabindranath was one of the finest manifestations of Indian mystic poetry, Hindi literature was also immensely enriched by great mystic poets like Mahadevi Varma,� he said, adding that mysticism in Assamese poetry made its journey from the writings of Lakshminath Bezbaroa, Chandrakumar Agarwala, Ambikagiri Roychoudhury and Nalinibala Devi.

Elaborating on the majesty of Assamese mystic poetry, Hazarika referred to the monumental contributions of mystic poets like Raghunath Choudhury, Durgeswar Sarma, Ananda Chandra Agarwala, Dharmeswari Devi Baruani, Nilamoni Phukan (�Koka�), Dibya Prabha Bharali, Dimbeswar Neog and Sailadhar Rajkhowa.

In his illuminating discourse, Anis-uz-Zaman, president of the Assam Kavi Samaj, said that Assamese poetry had its fountain spring in the folk songs dating back to the pre-Christian era.

�Just like the Brahmaputra enriches the rivers and rivulets in the State, it was the folk songs and folk music that work like a soul sustaining the growth and existence of modern Assamese poetry. The Bihu songs and the zikirs also exercise tremendous influence on the shaping of the entire Assamese poetry,� he said.

Mahendra Bora, retired chief librarian of the Tezpur University, and also the convener of the meeting, welcomed the guests and introduced the members of the family.

Dr Surendra Mohan Mahanta, Mira Das and Urmila Kalita presented folk songs, while Bhanu Deka, Mafizuddin Ahmed, Anjali Hazarika, Deba Prasad Talukdar, Azida Ahmed, Pratul Sarma, Syeda Majani Ahmed and Sobha Khanikar recited self-composed poems. Ruma Rajkhowa, Jivan Chandra Goswami and Lilakanta Bora read out short stories.

Rajib Ahmed, who was awarded literary pension this year, was felicitated in the meeting.

Madhuri Bhuyan Kalita, secretary of Alochana Chakra, read out the proceedings of the last meeting, while Dr Chandraprabha Das reviewed the poems, short stories and essays read out in the last meeting.

DN Chakravartty, in his presidential remarks, said that the aim of an ideal literature was to bring forth the divinity latent in the human heart. �It is literature that can inspire even the humble person to make the supreme sacrifice for the cause of one�s country and mankind,� he said.