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Loopholes in new education policy: AASU

By Staff Reporter
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GUWAHATI, July 30 - The AASU today said that the new National Education Policy, 2020 would widen the gap between the private and government institutions in the absence of proper academic infrastructure in all parts of the country.

�The new National Education Policy envisages achieving a centralised system of education. However, in India, there are various social, economic and geographical factors that affect the overall academic environment of any particular state. In a country that still lacks even basic facilities like electrification and other basic means of communication, a lot of factors need to be considered before imposing an extensively centralised education policy,� AASU president Dipanka Kumar Nath and general secretary Lurin Jyoti Gogoi said.

AASU further said the Centre has overlooked the need for extensive debates and consultations over various provisions of the education policy.

�In Assam, there are schools which do not have spacious classrooms, necessary academic tools or a healthy teacher-student ratio. So, the wide-ranging reforms that aim to make the education system contemporary are still difficult to achieve,� AASU added.

Considering the federal structure of Indian democracy, and existing diversities in the country, extensive centralisation of schemes and policies must be avoided, AASU said.

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Loopholes in new education policy: AASU

GUWAHATI, July 30 - The AASU today said that the new National Education Policy, 2020 would widen the gap between the private and government institutions in the absence of proper academic infrastructure in all parts of the country.

�The new National Education Policy envisages achieving a centralised system of education. However, in India, there are various social, economic and geographical factors that affect the overall academic environment of any particular state. In a country that still lacks even basic facilities like electrification and other basic means of communication, a lot of factors need to be considered before imposing an extensively centralised education policy,� AASU president Dipanka Kumar Nath and general secretary Lurin Jyoti Gogoi said.

AASU further said the Centre has overlooked the need for extensive debates and consultations over various provisions of the education policy.

�In Assam, there are schools which do not have spacious classrooms, necessary academic tools or a healthy teacher-student ratio. So, the wide-ranging reforms that aim to make the education system contemporary are still difficult to achieve,� AASU added.

Considering the federal structure of Indian democracy, and existing diversities in the country, extensive centralisation of schemes and policies must be avoided, AASU said.

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