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Moments of bonding and solidarity amid war ravaged Ukraine

By The Assam Tribune
Moments of bonding and solidarity amid war ravaged Ukraine
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Photo: AP

Guwahati, June 20: As the Russia-Ukraine continues to escalate, a dire humanitarian crisis is unfolding as millions flee their homes since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022. Majority of the Ukrainian refugees are women and children and they're part of what the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is calling the fastest-growing refugee crisis in Europe since World War II. The organisation further reports that every second, one more Ukrainian child becomes a refugee of the Ukraine-Russia War.

From coping with trauma in a humourous way to welcoming refugees with open arms, here are few stories of refugees from war ravaged Ukraine.

AP Photo


Elected as the President of Ukraine in 2019, Volodymyr Zelenskyy was Ukraine's most famous comedian. His famous comedy series "Servant of the People," depicted him as a lovable high school teacher who accidentally becomes president — before he later actually became one for real. There is no denying the fact that the element of comedy is somewhere intact among the Ukrainians as they cope with the trauma of the ongoing war.

Ukrainians away from the front are using jokes and humour as weapons — against war-time anxiety against Russia.

For instance, a comedian couple Serhiy Lipko and Anastasia Zukhvala chose to marry amid the war. The wedding ceremony was a rushed affair because Lipko will shortly be deployed as a soldier on the battlefields of Ukraine.

The army gave him a day off to tie the knot, a quick in-and-out of a marriage office. While Zukhvala wore a simple crown of blue flowers in her hair, Lipko was in olive-green fatigues. Right after their nuptials, they headed to a stand-up comedy club in Ukraine's capital, Kyiv to laugh out loud and entice the audience as well.

A growing number of couples are being separated by war with Russia. Lipko was building a career as a comic before the defense of his country called for his service.

The war isn't remotely funny, but Ukrainians are learning to laugh about the awfulness of it all and to stay sane in the brutality that has killed tens of thousands of people.



An American, Aaron Jackson rose to the occasion for refugees from Ukraine who were struggling to stay with their pets.

As per reports, Jackson, the founder of the non-profit onganrsation Planting Peace, travelled to Poland shortly after Russia invaded Ukraine. He estimates that he has helped find housing for some 300 refugees, including many dog owners who struggled to stay with their pets.

When the dogs coming from Ukraine were not allowed to mix with the local dogs in the shelters in Poland, Jackson took it upon him and managed to establish an animal shelter for the dogs rescued from the war ravaged country. Moreover, many Ukrainian wanted to give their dogs to the shelter because they were homeless and didn't want their dog to be out in the cold. Jackson's timely efforts yielded results as he was able to build a safe haven for the canine friends.


Alona Chugai (left) and Lesia Orshoko (right) pose at Ben Gurion Airport with their Aunt Luba who was already in Israel.

A good deed by a woman during the Holocaust created lifelong bonds as two Ukrainian women who've fled their country amid turmoil brought on by the Russian invasion have found refuge in Israel.

According to reports, Maria Blishchik hid a Jewish girl named Fanya Bass in Ukraine during World War II from Nazis, saving her life and ensuring that her family lineage would not end. Both women have since passed away, but the act created a lifelong bond between their families.

Reportedly, Fanya's granddaughter Sharon Bass welcomed Lasia Orshoko and Alona Chugai, Blishchik's granddaughters and welcomed them with open arms to her home in Israel.

Sharon also visited her grandmother's grave to seek blessing and safely rescue the two Ukrainian refugees

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Moments of bonding and solidarity amid war ravaged Ukraine

Guwahati, June 20: As the Russia-Ukraine continues to escalate, a dire humanitarian crisis is unfolding as millions flee their homes since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022. Majority of the Ukrainian refugees are women and children and they're part of what the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is calling the fastest-growing refugee crisis in Europe since World War II. The organisation further reports that every second, one more Ukrainian child becomes a refugee of the Ukraine-Russia War.

From coping with trauma in a humourous way to welcoming refugees with open arms, here are few stories of refugees from war ravaged Ukraine.

AP Photo


Elected as the President of Ukraine in 2019, Volodymyr Zelenskyy was Ukraine's most famous comedian. His famous comedy series "Servant of the People," depicted him as a lovable high school teacher who accidentally becomes president — before he later actually became one for real. There is no denying the fact that the element of comedy is somewhere intact among the Ukrainians as they cope with the trauma of the ongoing war.

Ukrainians away from the front are using jokes and humour as weapons — against war-time anxiety against Russia.

For instance, a comedian couple Serhiy Lipko and Anastasia Zukhvala chose to marry amid the war. The wedding ceremony was a rushed affair because Lipko will shortly be deployed as a soldier on the battlefields of Ukraine.

The army gave him a day off to tie the knot, a quick in-and-out of a marriage office. While Zukhvala wore a simple crown of blue flowers in her hair, Lipko was in olive-green fatigues. Right after their nuptials, they headed to a stand-up comedy club in Ukraine's capital, Kyiv to laugh out loud and entice the audience as well.

A growing number of couples are being separated by war with Russia. Lipko was building a career as a comic before the defense of his country called for his service.

The war isn't remotely funny, but Ukrainians are learning to laugh about the awfulness of it all and to stay sane in the brutality that has killed tens of thousands of people.



An American, Aaron Jackson rose to the occasion for refugees from Ukraine who were struggling to stay with their pets.

As per reports, Jackson, the founder of the non-profit onganrsation Planting Peace, travelled to Poland shortly after Russia invaded Ukraine. He estimates that he has helped find housing for some 300 refugees, including many dog owners who struggled to stay with their pets.

When the dogs coming from Ukraine were not allowed to mix with the local dogs in the shelters in Poland, Jackson took it upon him and managed to establish an animal shelter for the dogs rescued from the war ravaged country. Moreover, many Ukrainian wanted to give their dogs to the shelter because they were homeless and didn't want their dog to be out in the cold. Jackson's timely efforts yielded results as he was able to build a safe haven for the canine friends.


Alona Chugai (left) and Lesia Orshoko (right) pose at Ben Gurion Airport with their Aunt Luba who was already in Israel.

A good deed by a woman during the Holocaust created lifelong bonds as two Ukrainian women who've fled their country amid turmoil brought on by the Russian invasion have found refuge in Israel.

According to reports, Maria Blishchik hid a Jewish girl named Fanya Bass in Ukraine during World War II from Nazis, saving her life and ensuring that her family lineage would not end. Both women have since passed away, but the act created a lifelong bond between their families.

Reportedly, Fanya's granddaughter Sharon Bass welcomed Lasia Orshoko and Alona Chugai, Blishchik's granddaughters and welcomed them with open arms to her home in Israel.

Sharon also visited her grandmother's grave to seek blessing and safely rescue the two Ukrainian refugees