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Genesis of Sivasagar Kali Mandir

By Correspondent

SIVASAGAR, Nov 4 � The sacred river, Basistha Ganga (Dikhow) once flowed near the Maha Kali Dham. The great martyr, Piyoli Phukon once travelled along this river. It is believed that thousand of years ago, Maharishi Basistha had established a hermitage on the banks of the Dikhow. Which is why the river is also called the Basistha Ganga.

The Dikhow has changed its direction during the course of time. The Tengani Beel marks the ancient course of the river. A stadium is being constructed in the memory of Piyoli Phukon. The Achartantra states that Basistha had attained siddhi after meditating on Mohamaya Tara at Mahishigram in Bihar. It has been contradicted by some tantras which claim that he had attained siddhi in the Kamakhya. He established Devi Tara in Kamrup. That is why Tara is also known as Basistha Radhika.

According to the Yoginitantra, Devi Tara and Devi Kala are same. It may be mentioned here that the idol of the deity in the Ugratara temple is not that of Dakshina Kali. When Basistha arrived in Kamrup from China, Kamrup was being ruled by Narakasura. Basistha was insulted by Narakasura when he had desired to visit Devi Kamakhya. He had cursed Narakasura and moved towards the east.

Basistha is believed to have come to Kamrup 4,000 years ago. It is probable that he came to the banks of the Dikhow river and worshipped Kali. It is also possible that Basistha had worshipped this idol, at present installed at the Kali Mandir in Sivasagar and started a tantric tradition.

The Kali statue standing six feet and two inches tall with a thickness of one foot and width of six feet and two inches, which was found underground, is engraved on a single rock. The style of sculpture accentuates its uniqueness, which is very rare in India. The face of the idol appears to have a tribal impression. The Sakta cult had prevailed among the Chutias for thousands of years. Basically, they were the devotees of Tamreswari (Kesaikhati) of Sadiya. There is a habitation of the Chutias, just 1 km away from the temple. The Sakta cult also flourished during the days of the Ahoms. Phuleswari Kuwori embraced its as the official religion. It is up to archaeologists to ascertain when the statue was engraved, and who originally worshipped it.

The present temple was erected by the local people in 1931 on the auspicious day of Mahalaya. The plot of land, on which the temple stands, was owned by late Birajamanda Barua and late Lilawati Barua. From 2002, the Mandir Parichalana Samity has been looking after the affairs of the temple and has developed it.

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Genesis of Sivasagar Kali Mandir

SIVASAGAR, Nov 4 � The sacred river, Basistha Ganga (Dikhow) once flowed near the Maha Kali Dham. The great martyr, Piyoli Phukon once travelled along this river. It is believed that thousand of years ago, Maharishi Basistha had established a hermitage on the banks of the Dikhow. Which is why the river is also called the Basistha Ganga.

The Dikhow has changed its direction during the course of time. The Tengani Beel marks the ancient course of the river. A stadium is being constructed in the memory of Piyoli Phukon. The Achartantra states that Basistha had attained siddhi after meditating on Mohamaya Tara at Mahishigram in Bihar. It has been contradicted by some tantras which claim that he had attained siddhi in the Kamakhya. He established Devi Tara in Kamrup. That is why Tara is also known as Basistha Radhika.

According to the Yoginitantra, Devi Tara and Devi Kala are same. It may be mentioned here that the idol of the deity in the Ugratara temple is not that of Dakshina Kali. When Basistha arrived in Kamrup from China, Kamrup was being ruled by Narakasura. Basistha was insulted by Narakasura when he had desired to visit Devi Kamakhya. He had cursed Narakasura and moved towards the east.

Basistha is believed to have come to Kamrup 4,000 years ago. It is probable that he came to the banks of the Dikhow river and worshipped Kali. It is also possible that Basistha had worshipped this idol, at present installed at the Kali Mandir in Sivasagar and started a tantric tradition.

The Kali statue standing six feet and two inches tall with a thickness of one foot and width of six feet and two inches, which was found underground, is engraved on a single rock. The style of sculpture accentuates its uniqueness, which is very rare in India. The face of the idol appears to have a tribal impression. The Sakta cult had prevailed among the Chutias for thousands of years. Basically, they were the devotees of Tamreswari (Kesaikhati) of Sadiya. There is a habitation of the Chutias, just 1 km away from the temple. The Sakta cult also flourished during the days of the Ahoms. Phuleswari Kuwori embraced its as the official religion. It is up to archaeologists to ascertain when the statue was engraved, and who originally worshipped it.

The present temple was erected by the local people in 1931 on the auspicious day of Mahalaya. The plot of land, on which the temple stands, was owned by late Birajamanda Barua and late Lilawati Barua. From 2002, the Mandir Parichalana Samity has been looking after the affairs of the temple and has developed it.

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