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Demonetisation unlikely to succeed in war: Gogoi

By Staff Reporter

GUWAHATI, Nov 14 - Terming the decision of the Central government to demonetise the Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 currency notes as �driven by political considerations,� former Chief Minister and senior Congress leader Tarun Gogoi said that it is unlikely to have any long-term effect in the fight against black money and corruption.

�I am not saying that it (demonetisation) is a wrong decision. But it could have been planned in a better manner so that the common people did not have to face harassment. It is the common people who are now being forced to stand in queues outside banks and ATMs,� he said.

�This will only affect the small fish. The big ones will escape the net. If they can catch the big fishes, I will be the first one to give them (the BJP-led NDA government) credit,� he said, adding that the major beneficiaries of black money are unlikely to suffer any problem.

The former Chief Minister said demonetisation initiatives had been taken in the country earlier also, but the common man had never faced the kind of inconvenience as this time.

�I, too, welcome the decision to demonetise the notes. But what has happened in the aftermath? Why did the RBI not print more Rs 100 denomination notes? Crores of middle class citizens, small traders and daily wage earners are suffering while the black money holders are sleeping peacefully. The government is compelling those who have earned their money with hard labour to suffer harassment,� Gogoi said.

He also accused the BJP of being the biggest beneficiary of black money and said that the saffron party�s leaders move around in private planes and go for election campaign using hired choppers. Gogoi demanded a full audit of the BJP�s party and election expenses and said the Congress, too, is ready to submit its own expenses for scrutiny.

Regarding the APSC issue, Gogoi said that a comprehensive inquiry into the functioning of the body should be undertaken going all the way back to the 1990s.

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Demonetisation unlikely to succeed in war: Gogoi

GUWAHATI, Nov 14 - Terming the decision of the Central government to demonetise the Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 currency notes as �driven by political considerations,� former Chief Minister and senior Congress leader Tarun Gogoi said that it is unlikely to have any long-term effect in the fight against black money and corruption.

�I am not saying that it (demonetisation) is a wrong decision. But it could have been planned in a better manner so that the common people did not have to face harassment. It is the common people who are now being forced to stand in queues outside banks and ATMs,� he said.

�This will only affect the small fish. The big ones will escape the net. If they can catch the big fishes, I will be the first one to give them (the BJP-led NDA government) credit,� he said, adding that the major beneficiaries of black money are unlikely to suffer any problem.

The former Chief Minister said demonetisation initiatives had been taken in the country earlier also, but the common man had never faced the kind of inconvenience as this time.

�I, too, welcome the decision to demonetise the notes. But what has happened in the aftermath? Why did the RBI not print more Rs 100 denomination notes? Crores of middle class citizens, small traders and daily wage earners are suffering while the black money holders are sleeping peacefully. The government is compelling those who have earned their money with hard labour to suffer harassment,� Gogoi said.

He also accused the BJP of being the biggest beneficiary of black money and said that the saffron party�s leaders move around in private planes and go for election campaign using hired choppers. Gogoi demanded a full audit of the BJP�s party and election expenses and said the Congress, too, is ready to submit its own expenses for scrutiny.

Regarding the APSC issue, Gogoi said that a comprehensive inquiry into the functioning of the body should be undertaken going all the way back to the 1990s.