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Change in approach to flood warning system

By SANJOY RAY
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GUWAHATI, Sept 27 ��In the wake of floodwater causing a series of devastations in Assam and Meghalaya, the North Eastern Space Application Centre (NESAC) has opted for a�change in approach to strengthen its early warning mechanism vis-�-vis floods and possible cloud bursts.

The Shillong-based NESAC, as part of a comprehensive plan, will be using the weather research and forecasting model throughout the day especially to study cloud formation in the evening and night hours, as was the situation leading to the

recent flood fury in Assam and Meghalaya.

The NESAC is also going to have a high power computing system that will facilitate passing on accurate and timely warning to the disaster response forces and other authorities concerned.

The change in its approach, according to NESAC, will go a long way in minimising loss of human lives and property in case of an eventuality caused by nature.

At the moment, the model is being used only in the morning hours, Dr S Sudhakar Rao, director of NESAC told this reporter over telephone. NESAC is responsible for providing early warnings for floods to Assam and other States.

�We after analyzing the recent devastations have also decided to increase the strength of its workforce, especially scientists to facilitate round-the-clock study of the cloud formation,� Rao said, adding that experts from IITs and NITs would be roped in for the purpose.

The devastation caused by floodwaters in Assam and Meghalaya has so far killed nearly 80 persons besides leaving thousands homeless.

�As on today, we are missing out on night formation of clouds, giving very less time to the ground level workers to respond on time. In the last case, we had passed the warning but by then it was late. With the new system, we must be able to predict or anticipate such nature�s fury at least 24 hours early,� Dr Rao said.

The ISRO-approved mini high power computer or cluster computer, he said, will cost at least Rs 40 lakh and once that is installed, positioning and activities of clouds could be assessed effectively to pass out early warnings.

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Change in approach to flood warning system

GUWAHATI, Sept 27 ��In the wake of floodwater causing a series of devastations in Assam and Meghalaya, the North Eastern Space Application Centre (NESAC) has opted for a�change in approach to strengthen its early warning mechanism vis-�-vis floods and possible cloud bursts.

The Shillong-based NESAC, as part of a comprehensive plan, will be using the weather research and forecasting model throughout the day especially to study cloud formation in the evening and night hours, as was the situation leading to the

recent flood fury in Assam and Meghalaya.

The NESAC is also going to have a high power computing system that will facilitate passing on accurate and timely warning to the disaster response forces and other authorities concerned.

The change in its approach, according to NESAC, will go a long way in minimising loss of human lives and property in case of an eventuality caused by nature.

At the moment, the model is being used only in the morning hours, Dr S Sudhakar Rao, director of NESAC told this reporter over telephone. NESAC is responsible for providing early warnings for floods to Assam and other States.

�We after analyzing the recent devastations have also decided to increase the strength of its workforce, especially scientists to facilitate round-the-clock study of the cloud formation,� Rao said, adding that experts from IITs and NITs would be roped in for the purpose.

The devastation caused by floodwaters in Assam and Meghalaya has so far killed nearly 80 persons besides leaving thousands homeless.

�As on today, we are missing out on night formation of clouds, giving very less time to the ground level workers to respond on time. In the last case, we had passed the warning but by then it was late. With the new system, we must be able to predict or anticipate such nature�s fury at least 24 hours early,� Dr Rao said.

The ISRO-approved mini high power computer or cluster computer, he said, will cost at least Rs 40 lakh and once that is installed, positioning and activities of clouds could be assessed effectively to pass out early warnings.