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Burhi Aair Sadhu still a hit

By SANJOY RAY
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KALIABOR, Feb 2 � Even after more than a century since its first edition, Sahityarathi Lakshminath Bazbaroa�s Burhi Aair Sadhu continues to be the publishers� delight, giving even the contemporary bestsellers a run for their money.

This timeless children�s literary work by Bezbaroa is being sold like hot cakes in the ongoing session of Asam Sahitya Sabha at the Pandit Atmaram Sarma Samannay Kshetra here.

Many avid book lovers feel that while it is matter of great pride that the genius of Bezbaroa is still getting acceptance among young readers, it also brings to the fore the fact that readers are left with very little choice when it comes to quality work in children literature in Assam.

Publishers and book sellers at the Grantha Utsav (book fair) claimed that several thousand copies of the book have been sold in the last couple of days and that most of the book sellers were fast running out of their stock.

Some of the other seasoned Assamese and English writers whose book found warm acceptance in the fair are Homen Borgohain, Rita Choudhury, Chetan Bhagat and Durjoy Dutta.

�Great books are timeless, and works like Buri Aair Sadhu have been proving it time and again,� said Keshav Bora of Satirtha Gyanyatra, which has sold nearly 100 copies of Burhi Aair Sadhu in the last two days.

Raktim Thakuria of Raavan Books, while talking to this correspondent, echoed similar sentiments, saying, �Not the just Assamese version, there is also an equal demand for the translated versions of Bezbaroa�s work. The collection of short-stories in Burhi Aair Sadhu was first published in 1911, and it is now in public domain as per Copyright Law of India.

�Now that there is no copyright restriction, more copies are getting published in different forms and sizes. In spite of all these, it continues to be a reader�s delight and giving the best of the literary works a run for their money,� said Jayanta Das, an avid book reader.

Organizers said that there are 160 book stalls at the fair and each of those have sold at least 50 copies of Burhi Aair Sadhu in the last couple of days.

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Burhi Aair Sadhu still a hit

KALIABOR, Feb 2 � Even after more than a century since its first edition, Sahityarathi Lakshminath Bazbaroa�s Burhi Aair Sadhu continues to be the publishers� delight, giving even the contemporary bestsellers a run for their money.

This timeless children�s literary work by Bezbaroa is being sold like hot cakes in the ongoing session of Asam Sahitya Sabha at the Pandit Atmaram Sarma Samannay Kshetra here.

Many avid book lovers feel that while it is matter of great pride that the genius of Bezbaroa is still getting acceptance among young readers, it also brings to the fore the fact that readers are left with very little choice when it comes to quality work in children literature in Assam.

Publishers and book sellers at the Grantha Utsav (book fair) claimed that several thousand copies of the book have been sold in the last couple of days and that most of the book sellers were fast running out of their stock.

Some of the other seasoned Assamese and English writers whose book found warm acceptance in the fair are Homen Borgohain, Rita Choudhury, Chetan Bhagat and Durjoy Dutta.

�Great books are timeless, and works like Buri Aair Sadhu have been proving it time and again,� said Keshav Bora of Satirtha Gyanyatra, which has sold nearly 100 copies of Burhi Aair Sadhu in the last two days.

Raktim Thakuria of Raavan Books, while talking to this correspondent, echoed similar sentiments, saying, �Not the just Assamese version, there is also an equal demand for the translated versions of Bezbaroa�s work. The collection of short-stories in Burhi Aair Sadhu was first published in 1911, and it is now in public domain as per Copyright Law of India.

�Now that there is no copyright restriction, more copies are getting published in different forms and sizes. In spite of all these, it continues to be a reader�s delight and giving the best of the literary works a run for their money,� said Jayanta Das, an avid book reader.

Organizers said that there are 160 book stalls at the fair and each of those have sold at least 50 copies of Burhi Aair Sadhu in the last couple of days.