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Brahmaputra Valley film fest ends

By Staff Reporter
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GUWAHATI, Sept 29 - The four-day 7th Brahmaputra Valley Film Festival (BVFF) concluded today amid the participation of several acclaimed directors and filmmakers.

The results of the BVFF Short Film Contest-2019 were also declared.

Rakesh Moirangthem from Manipur won the first prize for his movie Pe (The Umbrella) and he received a cash prize of Rs 1 lakh. Buddhadeb Barman, the first runner-up for his movie Lachhka Dangir Katha, received a cash prize of Rs 70,000. The second runner-up Maharshi Tuhin Kashyap, for his movie Kaan Phus Phusot Phus Phusoni (Poetry of Whispers), received Rs 50,000.

The chief guest, B Paul Muktieh, Chairman and Managing Director of NEDFi, gave away the prizes to the winners.

The fourth day started with the screening of Priya Thuvassery�s documentary Coral Woman. The documentary is both a profile of Uma Mani and her efforts to address the threat to coral reefs from bleaching, pollution and global warming. Born in a traditional family in Tamil Nadu, 53-year-old Uma, a homemaker, has been trying to bring attention to this alarming environmental issue through her paintings.

This was followed by the screening of the film Jacqueline I Am Coming directed by Banty Dubey. The story is about a 40-year-old unmarried Hindu man Kashi Tiwary who finds love in a church. Jacqueline, however, has a history of mental issues and is admitted to an asylum.

A panel discussion featuring Karan Oberoi, Bidita Bag and Prabal Baruah, moderated by Karma Paljor, on the topic �Nurturing Talent from Northeast India� was another highlight of the day. This followed the screening of the movie Picasso directed by Abhijeet Mohan Warang. The film is about fathers and sons, hopes and dreams � of life imitating art, and how art can heal lives.

The festival ended with the awards ceremony and the screening of the movie T for Tajmahal directed by Kireet Khurana. T For Tajmahal is a young man�s journey to bring literacy to his village through a unique social enterprise, under which the customers need to teach the village kids instead of paying for food.

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Brahmaputra Valley film fest ends

GUWAHATI, Sept 29 - The four-day 7th Brahmaputra Valley Film Festival (BVFF) concluded today amid the participation of several acclaimed directors and filmmakers.

The results of the BVFF Short Film Contest-2019 were also declared.

Rakesh Moirangthem from Manipur won the first prize for his movie Pe (The Umbrella) and he received a cash prize of Rs 1 lakh. Buddhadeb Barman, the first runner-up for his movie Lachhka Dangir Katha, received a cash prize of Rs 70,000. The second runner-up Maharshi Tuhin Kashyap, for his movie Kaan Phus Phusot Phus Phusoni (Poetry of Whispers), received Rs 50,000.

The chief guest, B Paul Muktieh, Chairman and Managing Director of NEDFi, gave away the prizes to the winners.

The fourth day started with the screening of Priya Thuvassery�s documentary Coral Woman. The documentary is both a profile of Uma Mani and her efforts to address the threat to coral reefs from bleaching, pollution and global warming. Born in a traditional family in Tamil Nadu, 53-year-old Uma, a homemaker, has been trying to bring attention to this alarming environmental issue through her paintings.

This was followed by the screening of the film Jacqueline I Am Coming directed by Banty Dubey. The story is about a 40-year-old unmarried Hindu man Kashi Tiwary who finds love in a church. Jacqueline, however, has a history of mental issues and is admitted to an asylum.

A panel discussion featuring Karan Oberoi, Bidita Bag and Prabal Baruah, moderated by Karma Paljor, on the topic �Nurturing Talent from Northeast India� was another highlight of the day. This followed the screening of the movie Picasso directed by Abhijeet Mohan Warang. The film is about fathers and sons, hopes and dreams � of life imitating art, and how art can heal lives.

The festival ended with the awards ceremony and the screening of the movie T for Tajmahal directed by Kireet Khurana. T For Tajmahal is a young man�s journey to bring literacy to his village through a unique social enterprise, under which the customers need to teach the village kids instead of paying for food.