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BBCI hails ban on e-cigarettes

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GUWAHATI, Sept 24 - The management of the city-based Dr B Borooah Cancer Institute (BBCI) has appreciated the Union Cabinet Committee�s decision to ban e-cigarettes or Electronic Nicotine Delivery System (ENDS).

�E-cigarettes contain nicotine which is a highly toxic chemical and it can adversely affect any organ of the human body. As per the World Health Organisation�s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) report, the existing evidence shows that ENDS aerosol is not merely �water vapour� as is often claimed in the marketing for these products. E-cigarette use poses serious threats to adolescents and unborn and newborn babies. In addition, it increases exposure of non-smokers and bystanders to nicotine and a number of toxicants. Also, the main health risk from nicotine exposure other than through inhalation is nicotine overdose by ingestion, as per the report,� said the BBCI.

Lauding the decision, Dr Amal Chandra Kataki, Director of BBCI, said that nicotine is the most addictive substance currently known in the world and it is considered even more addictive than heroin.

�Furthermore, as per literature, nearly 80 per cent of those who start using e-cigarette in an attempt to quit cigarettes cannot quit the e-cigarette addiction. The solution of letting conventional cigarette smokers switch over to e-cigarette for quitting tobacco addiction is like moving to deep sea from the devil,� he said.

He added that a country like the United States of America is witnessing an epidemic of e-cigarette addiction among the youth and teenagers.

�The major problem has been that, once introduced into the system, it is very difficult to enforce ban through legislation. In a country like India, it is difficult to ban a product once it has a large consumer base and social acceptance. The classic example is that of gutkha and pan masala. India does not manufacture e-cigarette products and it was mostly imported. Therefore, there is no revenue loss to the nation,� said Dr Kataki.

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BBCI hails ban on e-cigarettes

GUWAHATI, Sept 24 - The management of the city-based Dr B Borooah Cancer Institute (BBCI) has appreciated the Union Cabinet Committee�s decision to ban e-cigarettes or Electronic Nicotine Delivery System (ENDS).

�E-cigarettes contain nicotine which is a highly toxic chemical and it can adversely affect any organ of the human body. As per the World Health Organisation�s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) report, the existing evidence shows that ENDS aerosol is not merely �water vapour� as is often claimed in the marketing for these products. E-cigarette use poses serious threats to adolescents and unborn and newborn babies. In addition, it increases exposure of non-smokers and bystanders to nicotine and a number of toxicants. Also, the main health risk from nicotine exposure other than through inhalation is nicotine overdose by ingestion, as per the report,� said the BBCI.

Lauding the decision, Dr Amal Chandra Kataki, Director of BBCI, said that nicotine is the most addictive substance currently known in the world and it is considered even more addictive than heroin.

�Furthermore, as per literature, nearly 80 per cent of those who start using e-cigarette in an attempt to quit cigarettes cannot quit the e-cigarette addiction. The solution of letting conventional cigarette smokers switch over to e-cigarette for quitting tobacco addiction is like moving to deep sea from the devil,� he said.

He added that a country like the United States of America is witnessing an epidemic of e-cigarette addiction among the youth and teenagers.

�The major problem has been that, once introduced into the system, it is very difficult to enforce ban through legislation. In a country like India, it is difficult to ban a product once it has a large consumer base and social acceptance. The classic example is that of gutkha and pan masala. India does not manufacture e-cigarette products and it was mostly imported. Therefore, there is no revenue loss to the nation,� said Dr Kataki.