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Archaeological ruins found on Narakasur Hills

By AJIT PATOWARY
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GUWAHATI, March 4 - A five-member team of archaeology enthusiasts, led by city-based general surgeon Dr Satyakam Phukan discovered a brick wall, perceived to be a part of the city�s pre-Ahom or Ahom era fortification to save it from the invaders, atop the Narakasur Hills. However, only systematic archaeological excavation will be able to determine the date of the brick wall.

Strategically, Guwahati was an important place for the Assamese as well as the Muslim invaders. All of them viewed Guwahati as an important location for its ideal setting. And this made the fortification of the city an obligation for the defenders, who were essentially the indigenous people. Such fortifications prevented entry of the marauding forces from outside the city.

The team of archaeological enthusiasts has also recorded extensive archaeological ruins on the Narakasur Hills during its exploration of the hills between the west of the television tower atop it and its end in the Birubari area of the city. The expedition was undertaken on February 19 and the members of the team included Pradip Dewan, Binoy Kumar Das, Alexander Chakma and Haren Das, besides Dr Phukan, who could get the cue of the existence of the wall from an elderly gentleman of Uzanbazar locality, the late Prabhat Malla Barua, long back. Late Barua was the brother of noted poet late Ajit Barua.

At many places along the crest of the hills, the team could uncover many brick structures hidden under the soil. Dr Phukan told this newspaper that along the crest of the hills, remains of an extensive wall, possibly some ancient fortification, can be ascertained. Remains of the brick structure were evident all along the track, he said.

He maintained that a professional excavation will surely yield more positive results on the Narakasur Hills. A road has been built along the crest up to an under-construction water treatment plant.

Many people have settled in the area and earth cutting is on along the crest of the hills, where the road is laid. The brick structures are visible there. In one place below that road, a completely untouched part of the brick wall is well visible.

�These ruins were never explored neither during the British era nor in the post-Independence era of India by any authority. But we are certain that systematic archaeological exploration will bring to light many hitherto unknown facts about the history and archaeology of Guwahati and Assam,� said Dr Phukan. In a letter to the State�s Director of Archaeology, he requested the authority to initiate necessary steps for undertaking systematic archaeological exploration of the site.

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Archaeological ruins found on Narakasur Hills

GUWAHATI, March 4 - A five-member team of archaeology enthusiasts, led by city-based general surgeon Dr Satyakam Phukan discovered a brick wall, perceived to be a part of the city�s pre-Ahom or Ahom era fortification to save it from the invaders, atop the Narakasur Hills. However, only systematic archaeological excavation will be able to determine the date of the brick wall.

Strategically, Guwahati was an important place for the Assamese as well as the Muslim invaders. All of them viewed Guwahati as an important location for its ideal setting. And this made the fortification of the city an obligation for the defenders, who were essentially the indigenous people. Such fortifications prevented entry of the marauding forces from outside the city.

The team of archaeological enthusiasts has also recorded extensive archaeological ruins on the Narakasur Hills during its exploration of the hills between the west of the television tower atop it and its end in the Birubari area of the city. The expedition was undertaken on February 19 and the members of the team included Pradip Dewan, Binoy Kumar Das, Alexander Chakma and Haren Das, besides Dr Phukan, who could get the cue of the existence of the wall from an elderly gentleman of Uzanbazar locality, the late Prabhat Malla Barua, long back. Late Barua was the brother of noted poet late Ajit Barua.

At many places along the crest of the hills, the team could uncover many brick structures hidden under the soil. Dr Phukan told this newspaper that along the crest of the hills, remains of an extensive wall, possibly some ancient fortification, can be ascertained. Remains of the brick structure were evident all along the track, he said.

He maintained that a professional excavation will surely yield more positive results on the Narakasur Hills. A road has been built along the crest up to an under-construction water treatment plant.

Many people have settled in the area and earth cutting is on along the crest of the hills, where the road is laid. The brick structures are visible there. In one place below that road, a completely untouched part of the brick wall is well visible.

�These ruins were never explored neither during the British era nor in the post-Independence era of India by any authority. But we are certain that systematic archaeological exploration will bring to light many hitherto unknown facts about the history and archaeology of Guwahati and Assam,� said Dr Phukan. In a letter to the State�s Director of Archaeology, he requested the authority to initiate necessary steps for undertaking systematic archaeological exploration of the site.