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25 cows succumb to black water disease near Kaziranga

By Correspondent
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KAZIRANGA, Jan 25 - Sensation prevails at Difloo pathar area near Kaziranga National Park following the death of 25 cows within a span of just ten days.

According to Dr Navin Pandey from the Corbett Foundation, the cows fell victim to �Black water (Clostridium chauvoie) disease� also called Black leg. The disease is said to be very serious and infectious in nature. It can spread to other healthy animals within a short time. If infected, the animal can die within 12 to 36 hours. The disease has spread to Khukani gaon of Difloo pathar area near the Kaziranga National Park.

Dr Pandey also informed this correspondent that the initial symptoms are swelling in the hind limbs, accumulation of gas in the hind limb muscles and high fever up to 106 degree F. Sometimes, animals can die without showing any symptoms. Since domestic livestock graze in Kaziranga, so it is important to check if any wild animals of Kaziranga National Park get infected with this disease.

A senior official of the Kaziranga National Park authority informed that a team of veterinary experts had been sent to the affected villages and provide vaccination to the remaining healthy domestic animals and control the disease soon. He added that steps were being taken to check if any wild animal was infected with the disease. The Corbett Foundation had already conducted an awareness programme to inform the people about this dreadful disease and requested the villagers not to allow their cows and other livestock to graze in or near the park area of Kaziranga.

The villagers were also told to separate the infected animals and keep them isolated so that the other healthy livestock are not at all infected. The need of the hour is that the State Veterinary department initiate a quick action plan to control the disease from further spreading, otherwise it will turn into an epidemic taking a heavy toll of both domestic as well as wild animals.

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25 cows succumb to black water disease near Kaziranga

KAZIRANGA, Jan 25 - Sensation prevails at Difloo pathar area near Kaziranga National Park following the death of 25 cows within a span of just ten days.

According to Dr Navin Pandey from the Corbett Foundation, the cows fell victim to �Black water (Clostridium chauvoie) disease� also called Black leg. The disease is said to be very serious and infectious in nature. It can spread to other healthy animals within a short time. If infected, the animal can die within 12 to 36 hours. The disease has spread to Khukani gaon of Difloo pathar area near the Kaziranga National Park.

Dr Pandey also informed this correspondent that the initial symptoms are swelling in the hind limbs, accumulation of gas in the hind limb muscles and high fever up to 106 degree F. Sometimes, animals can die without showing any symptoms. Since domestic livestock graze in Kaziranga, so it is important to check if any wild animals of Kaziranga National Park get infected with this disease.

A senior official of the Kaziranga National Park authority informed that a team of veterinary experts had been sent to the affected villages and provide vaccination to the remaining healthy domestic animals and control the disease soon. He added that steps were being taken to check if any wild animal was infected with the disease. The Corbett Foundation had already conducted an awareness programme to inform the people about this dreadful disease and requested the villagers not to allow their cows and other livestock to graze in or near the park area of Kaziranga.

The villagers were also told to separate the infected animals and keep them isolated so that the other healthy livestock are not at all infected. The need of the hour is that the State Veterinary department initiate a quick action plan to control the disease from further spreading, otherwise it will turn into an epidemic taking a heavy toll of both domestic as well as wild animals.