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Writer pens plight of Chinese-origin Assamese

By The Assam Tribune

NEW DELHI, Nov 21 (PTI) - She does not consider herself an activist but writer Rita Chowdhury has been fighting for the cause of hundreds of Assamese people of Chinese origin facing a severe identity crisis having been disowned both by China and India.

When the senior lecturer of political science at Cotton College in Guwahati chose to highlight the plight of some Chinese people who came to Assam in the Second World War in her novel "Makam", little did she know that she will soon mull a movement for their rehabilitation.

"I wanted to reconstruct that part of history, that dark phase," she says about the book which means 'golden horse' in Cantonese.

"The British brought hundreds of men from China to work in tea gardens. These workers soon became part of the Assamese society and many of them married local girls."

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Writer pens plight of Chinese-origin Assamese

NEW DELHI, Nov 21 (PTI) - She does not consider herself an activist but writer Rita Chowdhury has been fighting for the cause of hundreds of Assamese people of Chinese origin facing a severe identity crisis having been disowned both by China and India.

When the senior lecturer of political science at Cotton College in Guwahati chose to highlight the plight of some Chinese people who came to Assam in the Second World War in her novel "Makam", little did she know that she will soon mull a movement for their rehabilitation.

"I wanted to reconstruct that part of history, that dark phase," she says about the book which means 'golden horse' in Cantonese.

"The British brought hundreds of men from China to work in tea gardens. These workers soon became part of the Assamese society and many of them married local girls."