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Vector-borne diseases taking heavy toll

By Staff Reporter

GUWAHATI, Dec 7 - Vector-borne diseases are taking a heavy toll on Assam, with the State recording a steep rise in the number of dengue as well as acute encephalitis syndrome (AES), including Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases.

Dengue cases in the State this year have reached 4,899 (up to December 4) and health officials said this could be the highest ever recorded in a year. The maximum number of cases has been in Kamrup Metro district at 4,341. Four dengue deaths have been reported this year.

The previous highest number of cases was in the year 2013 at 4,526.

In 2010, the number of dengue cases detected was 237. It touched 1,058 in 2012, but came down to 85 in 2014. Last year, 1,076 positive dengue cases were detected, according to National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme statistics.

Till December 4, the State had also registered 423 Japanese encephalitis cases, the highest in the country, according to the Directorate General of Health Services of the Union Health Ministry. As many as 85 JE deaths have been reported in the State.

Uttar Pradesh has recorded 353 JE cases (68 deaths) so far, followed by Odisha at 221 cases (39 deaths).

Altogether 1,474 JE cases (256 deaths) have been detected in the country this year.

Health officials said the mosquito breeding is aided by peculiar weather conditions. �If the weather during the year favours mosquito breeding, we see a rise in the number of vector-borne diseases. In some years, the cases go up, in some, you see very less cases; it is due to seasonal variation. This year, there were good rains and the temperatures had been warm, which helped mosquito breeding,� a senior health official said.

The State�s geographical position and situation are also favourable for mosquito breeding, he said.

The NHM and GMC are continuing with fogging operations and drives for source reduction in the city, where 80 per cent of the State�s dengue cases has been reported.

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Vector-borne diseases taking heavy toll

GUWAHATI, Dec 7 - Vector-borne diseases are taking a heavy toll on Assam, with the State recording a steep rise in the number of dengue as well as acute encephalitis syndrome (AES), including Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases.

Dengue cases in the State this year have reached 4,899 (up to December 4) and health officials said this could be the highest ever recorded in a year. The maximum number of cases has been in Kamrup Metro district at 4,341. Four dengue deaths have been reported this year.

The previous highest number of cases was in the year 2013 at 4,526.

In 2010, the number of dengue cases detected was 237. It touched 1,058 in 2012, but came down to 85 in 2014. Last year, 1,076 positive dengue cases were detected, according to National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme statistics.

Till December 4, the State had also registered 423 Japanese encephalitis cases, the highest in the country, according to the Directorate General of Health Services of the Union Health Ministry. As many as 85 JE deaths have been reported in the State.

Uttar Pradesh has recorded 353 JE cases (68 deaths) so far, followed by Odisha at 221 cases (39 deaths).

Altogether 1,474 JE cases (256 deaths) have been detected in the country this year.

Health officials said the mosquito breeding is aided by peculiar weather conditions. �If the weather during the year favours mosquito breeding, we see a rise in the number of vector-borne diseases. In some years, the cases go up, in some, you see very less cases; it is due to seasonal variation. This year, there were good rains and the temperatures had been warm, which helped mosquito breeding,� a senior health official said.

The State�s geographical position and situation are also favourable for mosquito breeding, he said.

The NHM and GMC are continuing with fogging operations and drives for source reduction in the city, where 80 per cent of the State�s dengue cases has been reported.

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