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Security concerns haunt displaced Adivasis

By Tejesh Tripathi
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BONGAIGAON, Jan 11 � Adivasis displaced after the recent carnage perpetrated by the NDFB (Songbijit), in Kokrajhar and Chirang district still feel insecure to return to their native places apprehending fresh attacks by the militant group.

Currently 1,06,466 Adivasis have been taking shelter in relief camps in Kokrajhar and Chirang district facing an uncertain future. The Adivasis, who have been living in camps in Lungsung forest area in Kokrajhar district, are not at all agreeable to resettle at their native hamlets in the same forest area out of fear of the militants.

Shankar Tudo, 30, who was guarding his camp with bow and arrows and is a resident of Moinaguri forest village, said �We somehow could defend our hamlets from the attack of around 20 armed militants and 300 common people (of a particular community) laced with batons, machetes and spears, only by our courage and bows and arrows on December 24 at 10 am�.

So, the residents of Shankar�s village are seeking permanent security arrangements in the forest area and firm operations against the militants and their sympathisers before their resettlement in their native hamlets.

Shankar Murmu, (30), a farmer and resident of Ultapani in Kokrajhar district, recollecting the horrific moment of December 23 evening, said, �As I reached my village from the market in the evening, I heard gun shots. To save my life, I hid in the jungle. At around 9 pm, I reached home and found my two sons lying at the courtyard. Four-year-old Cornelius was dead while 18-month old Anthony was injured. I found my wife, who was taking shelter in a relative�s house far from my village, the next day�.

Security personnel recovered 11 bodies from Ultapani village after the attack.

Adivasis of Ultapani village are at Saralpara relief camp, which is 4 km from the Bhutan border, along with the inmates of six other violence-hit villages.

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Security concerns haunt displaced Adivasis

BONGAIGAON, Jan 11 � Adivasis displaced after the recent carnage perpetrated by the NDFB (Songbijit), in Kokrajhar and Chirang district still feel insecure to return to their native places apprehending fresh attacks by the militant group.

Currently 1,06,466 Adivasis have been taking shelter in relief camps in Kokrajhar and Chirang district facing an uncertain future. The Adivasis, who have been living in camps in Lungsung forest area in Kokrajhar district, are not at all agreeable to resettle at their native hamlets in the same forest area out of fear of the militants.

Shankar Tudo, 30, who was guarding his camp with bow and arrows and is a resident of Moinaguri forest village, said �We somehow could defend our hamlets from the attack of around 20 armed militants and 300 common people (of a particular community) laced with batons, machetes and spears, only by our courage and bows and arrows on December 24 at 10 am�.

So, the residents of Shankar�s village are seeking permanent security arrangements in the forest area and firm operations against the militants and their sympathisers before their resettlement in their native hamlets.

Shankar Murmu, (30), a farmer and resident of Ultapani in Kokrajhar district, recollecting the horrific moment of December 23 evening, said, �As I reached my village from the market in the evening, I heard gun shots. To save my life, I hid in the jungle. At around 9 pm, I reached home and found my two sons lying at the courtyard. Four-year-old Cornelius was dead while 18-month old Anthony was injured. I found my wife, who was taking shelter in a relative�s house far from my village, the next day�.

Security personnel recovered 11 bodies from Ultapani village after the attack.

Adivasis of Ultapani village are at Saralpara relief camp, which is 4 km from the Bhutan border, along with the inmates of six other violence-hit villages.