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Researchers� allegation against Cricket Australia

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SILCHAR, March 17 - A group of researchers including Hemanta Saikia, Dibyojyoti Bhattacharjee and Hoffie Lemmer who is from the University of Johannesburg have developed a fielding performance measure for cricket, however, the researchers now allege that Cricket Australia (CA) have claimed to have developed a fielding performance measure thus seeking intervention of the International Cricket Council (ICC).

�They are claiming of being the pioneer of using statistical analysis for quantifying fielding performance. CA further claimed that this method is developed within Cricket Australia's Team Performance department and puts fielding under the microscope like never before. CA website has already started collecting fielding data and published it,� said Saikia, who is also an Assistant Professor at Assam Agriculture University.

The researchers claim to have developed this fielding performance measure for cricket in 2012. Prior to that, there was no serious work on fielding performance measurement in cricket. Although different websites and organisations often ranked cricketers for their performance in batting, bowling and fielding, yet there was no scientific technique to assess fielding skills of players.

�The work was published in the International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching, Vol. 7, No. 4 in 2012. The research paper was entitled �A Double Weighted Tool to Measure the Fielding Performance in Cricket�. Following a Facebook post of the publication both print and electronic media gave an extensive coverage of that newly devised technique of fielding assessment during February-March, 2013.

�Understanding the importance of the work we contacted the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) but there was no response. V Jayadevan, of the VJD method fame (person who developed an alternative of the Duckworth Lewis method) advised us to write to David Richardson, the then CEO of ICC. We had a fruitful conversation with Richardson regarding this fielding performance measure. The statistician of ICC Geoff Allardice also prepared a report on our work. It reached us on April 30, 2013. He was of the opinion that as the method is based on ball-by-ball feeding of data in the computer so it requires a dedicated statistician and a supporting software, both of which were not available.�

Based on the suggestions of Allardice, the researchers claim to have developed a software called �FIELD-O-METER� with the help of two software engineers in late 2014 for quantifying fielding performance. However, the software could not be tested in domestic level cricket.

�Later on our work was referred by different authors working on sports analytics though out the world. Mention can be made of the works of Tim Swartz at the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Canada and in the works of Danielle Catherine MacDonald of Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand.�

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Researchers� allegation against Cricket Australia

SILCHAR, March 17 - A group of researchers including Hemanta Saikia, Dibyojyoti Bhattacharjee and Hoffie Lemmer who is from the University of Johannesburg have developed a fielding performance measure for cricket, however, the researchers now allege that Cricket Australia (CA) have claimed to have developed a fielding performance measure thus seeking intervention of the International Cricket Council (ICC).

�They are claiming of being the pioneer of using statistical analysis for quantifying fielding performance. CA further claimed that this method is developed within Cricket Australia's Team Performance department and puts fielding under the microscope like never before. CA website has already started collecting fielding data and published it,� said Saikia, who is also an Assistant Professor at Assam Agriculture University.

The researchers claim to have developed this fielding performance measure for cricket in 2012. Prior to that, there was no serious work on fielding performance measurement in cricket. Although different websites and organisations often ranked cricketers for their performance in batting, bowling and fielding, yet there was no scientific technique to assess fielding skills of players.

�The work was published in the International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching, Vol. 7, No. 4 in 2012. The research paper was entitled �A Double Weighted Tool to Measure the Fielding Performance in Cricket�. Following a Facebook post of the publication both print and electronic media gave an extensive coverage of that newly devised technique of fielding assessment during February-March, 2013.

�Understanding the importance of the work we contacted the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) but there was no response. V Jayadevan, of the VJD method fame (person who developed an alternative of the Duckworth Lewis method) advised us to write to David Richardson, the then CEO of ICC. We had a fruitful conversation with Richardson regarding this fielding performance measure. The statistician of ICC Geoff Allardice also prepared a report on our work. It reached us on April 30, 2013. He was of the opinion that as the method is based on ball-by-ball feeding of data in the computer so it requires a dedicated statistician and a supporting software, both of which were not available.�

Based on the suggestions of Allardice, the researchers claim to have developed a software called �FIELD-O-METER� with the help of two software engineers in late 2014 for quantifying fielding performance. However, the software could not be tested in domestic level cricket.

�Later on our work was referred by different authors working on sports analytics though out the world. Mention can be made of the works of Tim Swartz at the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Canada and in the works of Danielle Catherine MacDonald of Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand.�

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