Begin typing your search above and press return to search.

Rare bats seen at Golaghat locality

By CORRESPONDENT

GOLAGHAT, Oct 19 � Borneo fruit bats were first found in the jungles of Malaysia and Thailand. The bats are mostly found in tall trees with a height of more than 60 metres in the tropical jungles. The bats mostly eat guava, mango and other tropical fruits. These type of bats were once found in Nambor reserve forest in Golaghat district. But due to deforestation, the forests dwindled away and the bats shifted their habitat to other areas of the district where plenty of tall trees were available.

Recently, Md Tueas Rahman, photographer, National Geographic Channel and a documentary filmmaker while visiting the Padumoni-Bongaon area within a 10 km distance from Golaghat town, saw thousands of Borneo fruit bats in the jungles of the area. Rahman came to know from one resident of Padumoni-Bongaon, Dipak Bortamuly that the bats have been staying here since 2003 in the tall trees of the land belonging to him.

Rahman took photographs of the bats and requested the neighbouring people to protect them.

It may be mentioned here that due to expansion of agriculture activities and cultivation by deforestation, the bats were compelled to shift their habitation from Nambor RF and used to take shelter in Padumoni-Bongaon area.

Tueas Rahman had discussed with the rural people of Padumoni-Bongaon regarding protection and preservation of flora and fauna of the forests of Golaghat and appealed them to work against the poachers so that the rare bats could be protected.

Rahman after visiting the Nambor RF also organised an awareness meeting where people of different places, journalists and several NGOs also took part.

The local nature lovers of the areas have demanded the Forest department to take all possible steps against poaching of animals and birds of the Nambor reserve forests which was rich in biodiversity.

Next Story
Similar Posts
Rare bats seen at Golaghat locality

GOLAGHAT, Oct 19 � Borneo fruit bats were first found in the jungles of Malaysia and Thailand. The bats are mostly found in tall trees with a height of more than 60 metres in the tropical jungles. The bats mostly eat guava, mango and other tropical fruits. These type of bats were once found in Nambor reserve forest in Golaghat district. But due to deforestation, the forests dwindled away and the bats shifted their habitat to other areas of the district where plenty of tall trees were available.

Recently, Md Tueas Rahman, photographer, National Geographic Channel and a documentary filmmaker while visiting the Padumoni-Bongaon area within a 10 km distance from Golaghat town, saw thousands of Borneo fruit bats in the jungles of the area. Rahman came to know from one resident of Padumoni-Bongaon, Dipak Bortamuly that the bats have been staying here since 2003 in the tall trees of the land belonging to him.

Rahman took photographs of the bats and requested the neighbouring people to protect them.

It may be mentioned here that due to expansion of agriculture activities and cultivation by deforestation, the bats were compelled to shift their habitation from Nambor RF and used to take shelter in Padumoni-Bongaon area.

Tueas Rahman had discussed with the rural people of Padumoni-Bongaon regarding protection and preservation of flora and fauna of the forests of Golaghat and appealed them to work against the poachers so that the rare bats could be protected.

Rahman after visiting the Nambor RF also organised an awareness meeting where people of different places, journalists and several NGOs also took part.

The local nature lovers of the areas have demanded the Forest department to take all possible steps against poaching of animals and birds of the Nambor reserve forests which was rich in biodiversity.