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Project for conservation of amphibians, reptiles

By Staff Reporter

GUWAHATI, Aug 31 � In a development that is likely to bring in a lifeline to a number of threatened species, conservation group Aaranyak is bringing into focus herpetofauna of the region under an ongoing project. Scientists from Aaranyak and some other institutes will describe a few new species of amphibians in peer reviewed journals in the coming months.

Amphibians and reptiles of the region are among the less known wildlife of North East India, even though they play important roles in different ecosystems. Under the project North East Threatened Species Conservation Programme (NETSCOPE), amphibians and reptiles are being studied and documented in the context of their natural habitat.

Researchers from Aaranyak are determining the diversity of herpetofauna of the region along with mapping their distribution using GIS technology. They will also conduct research on the natural history of selected species which attract conservation concern.

Among the critical information that is likely to be revealed is the state of the ecosystems the amphibians and reptiles reside in. Most of them are indicator species, and their status reveals the quality of soil and water in their habitat, among other things.

Funded by several agencies, NETSCOPE provides 'strategic opportunities for conservation of threatened species unique to the North-east and has so far given new insights into more than a dozen species, including the Indian rhino, tiger, elephant, Gangetic dolphin, golden langur and hoolock gibbon. As part of the programme, camera trapping of tigers in Kaziranga National Park has yielded precious information about a healthy population.

Speaking to The Assam Tribune, Dr Bibhab Talukdar of Aaranyak mentioned that the project has been successful in identifying the status of a number of species and the threats they face. Information on species like the Bengal Florican and golden langur have expanded after research carried out under the project.

NETSCOPE attempts to develop and augment infrastructure in Protected Areas containing threatened species besides building capacity of forest staff engaged in their protection. It seeks to promote community park interface in areas which have witnessed human-wildlife conflict. Young scientists have also received exposure to wildlife and conservation concerns due to the programme in various parts of the North East.

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— Dalai Lama(THIS IS STATIC)

Project for conservation of amphibians, reptiles

GUWAHATI, Aug 31 � In a development that is likely to bring in a lifeline to a number of threatened species, conservation group Aaranyak is bringing into focus herpetofauna of the region under an ongoing project. Scientists from Aaranyak and some other institutes will describe a few new species of amphibians in peer reviewed journals in the coming months.

Amphibians and reptiles of the region are among the less known wildlife of North East India, even though they play important roles in different ecosystems. Under the project North East Threatened Species Conservation Programme (NETSCOPE), amphibians and reptiles are being studied and documented in the context of their natural habitat.

Researchers from Aaranyak are determining the diversity of herpetofauna of the region along with mapping their distribution using GIS technology. They will also conduct research on the natural history of selected species which attract conservation concern.

Among the critical information that is likely to be revealed is the state of the ecosystems the amphibians and reptiles reside in. Most of them are indicator species, and their status reveals the quality of soil and water in their habitat, among other things.

Funded by several agencies, NETSCOPE provides 'strategic opportunities for conservation of threatened species unique to the North-east and has so far given new insights into more than a dozen species, including the Indian rhino, tiger, elephant, Gangetic dolphin, golden langur and hoolock gibbon. As part of the programme, camera trapping of tigers in Kaziranga National Park has yielded precious information about a healthy population.

Speaking to The Assam Tribune, Dr Bibhab Talukdar of Aaranyak mentioned that the project has been successful in identifying the status of a number of species and the threats they face. Information on species like the Bengal Florican and golden langur have expanded after research carried out under the project.

NETSCOPE attempts to develop and augment infrastructure in Protected Areas containing threatened species besides building capacity of forest staff engaged in their protection. It seeks to promote community park interface in areas which have witnessed human-wildlife conflict. Young scientists have also received exposure to wildlife and conservation concerns due to the programme in various parts of the North East.

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— Dalai Lama(THIS IS STATIC)