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Patients gain from innovative treatment

By Staff Reporter

GUWAHATI, Oct 21 � The efficacy of some innovative efforts to reduce the pain of seriously or terminally ill patients have been vindicated by research carried out by a top US institution. Significantly, similar practices have also been adopted by the Dr B Borooah Cancer Institute for some time now.

Recent research in Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore have stated that seeing images of serene landscapes and listening to soothing sounds is enough to reduce the feeling of pain for many patients. Experts in palliative care have for long believed in pain relief through relaxing music and idyllic sights, but the research appears to have confirmed it for good.

Dr Amal Chandra Kataki, Director of Dr B Borooah Cancer Institute, told The Assam Tribune that pain is a complex physiological and emotional experience. Along with drug therapy, it must be ensured that a patient's activities are analysed, and anything that precipitates pain are either avoided or reduced.

Those well acquainted with pain and palliative care point to the fact that non-drug measures such as hot pads, recreation and music therapy do have roles to play in reducing the level of pain and emotional distress.

According to Dr Kataki, serene natural scenes, indoor games, relaxing environment all help seriously ill patients by stimulating the zeal for dignified living. �These activities enhance immune responses in a human body. Various neuro-transmitters, like endorphin, are secreted, which helps to combat various diseases,� he added.

It may be mentioned here that the World Health Organisation defines health as a state of complete mental, physical, social, psychological and spiritual well being and not merely as absence of disease or infirmity.

Acknowledging the findings of the Johns Hopkins research, Dr Kataki said that for some time the BBCI has sought to abide by the WHO's understanding of health and disease. With a more holistic idea of patient care, the BBCI has been taking patients to various places where they could enjoy time in a stress-free ambience.

Referring to a patient, Daya Devi Goswami of Dibrugarh, he revealed what the patient had said after being taken out on a tour: �When I came here I had given up hope. After treatment in this institute I am now confident that I shall be cured within a short time.�

Recently, the institute also connected all the indoor wards with a music system that plays soothing music every morning.

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Patients gain from innovative treatment

GUWAHATI, Oct 21 � The efficacy of some innovative efforts to reduce the pain of seriously or terminally ill patients have been vindicated by research carried out by a top US institution. Significantly, similar practices have also been adopted by the Dr B Borooah Cancer Institute for some time now.

Recent research in Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore have stated that seeing images of serene landscapes and listening to soothing sounds is enough to reduce the feeling of pain for many patients. Experts in palliative care have for long believed in pain relief through relaxing music and idyllic sights, but the research appears to have confirmed it for good.

Dr Amal Chandra Kataki, Director of Dr B Borooah Cancer Institute, told The Assam Tribune that pain is a complex physiological and emotional experience. Along with drug therapy, it must be ensured that a patient's activities are analysed, and anything that precipitates pain are either avoided or reduced.

Those well acquainted with pain and palliative care point to the fact that non-drug measures such as hot pads, recreation and music therapy do have roles to play in reducing the level of pain and emotional distress.

According to Dr Kataki, serene natural scenes, indoor games, relaxing environment all help seriously ill patients by stimulating the zeal for dignified living. �These activities enhance immune responses in a human body. Various neuro-transmitters, like endorphin, are secreted, which helps to combat various diseases,� he added.

It may be mentioned here that the World Health Organisation defines health as a state of complete mental, physical, social, psychological and spiritual well being and not merely as absence of disease or infirmity.

Acknowledging the findings of the Johns Hopkins research, Dr Kataki said that for some time the BBCI has sought to abide by the WHO's understanding of health and disease. With a more holistic idea of patient care, the BBCI has been taking patients to various places where they could enjoy time in a stress-free ambience.

Referring to a patient, Daya Devi Goswami of Dibrugarh, he revealed what the patient had said after being taken out on a tour: �When I came here I had given up hope. After treatment in this institute I am now confident that I shall be cured within a short time.�

Recently, the institute also connected all the indoor wards with a music system that plays soothing music every morning.