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�Lack of infrastructure pegging India back�

By Staff Reporter
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GUWAHATI, Nov 4 - Lack of infrastructure, human resources and adequate amount of energy are the factors behind India lagging far behind the United States of America, Russia and China in matters of space research, especially research on Mars, the red planet which is now believed to contain water in the form of ice which indicated the existence of life.

This was the observation made by noted space scientist Prof Jitendra Nath Goswami, a top space scientist of the country and the brain behind Chandrayan-I, the first Indian mission to the Moon. He was delivering the 37th foundation day lecture of the Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology (IASST) here on Tuesday on space exploration with special focus on the Indian scene.

The information that Mars contains water in the form of ice has generated tremendous enthusiasm within the scientific community, because this indicates existence of life in the red planet, he said.

Prof Goswami, who spoke on the development of the space research activities in a chronological manner, said though India does not have infrastructure like high resolution sensors, full-fledged indigenous capacity sensors for probing the Moon and the Mars, it has been making efforts to develop such infrastructure.

Addressing a gathering of physicists, mathematicians, biological scientists, teachers and students of various institutions of higher education, he also informed that efforts are on to send the Chandrayan-II to the Moon. The Chandrayan-II will be an improved version of the Chandrayan-I, he said.

He exhorted the younger generation of the country to engage themselves honestly and in a dedicated manner in space research activities.

At the function, which was presided over by former Principal of Cotton College, Prof Anil Kumar Goswami, three scientists � Prof MK Chaudhuri, Vice-Chancellor of Tezpur University, Prof HP Barthakur, a former Professor and Head of the Department of Soil Science of the Assam Agricultural University and Prof CK Rajkonwar ex-Secretary, IASST and retired Professor and Head of the Department of Gynaecology, College of Veterinary Sciences were felicitated for their contributions to the IASST.

The felicitated scientists recollected their association with the IASST. Prof Chaudhuri specially recollected the memory of his involvement in the transition process of the IASST from a State Government institute to a Central Government one. He advised the students not be complacent with their present achievements. They should aspire for more, he said.

The Director of IASST, NC Talukdar welcomed the guests, while its Registrar, Dr Diganta Goswami offered the vote of thanks. The day-long programme concluded with a colourful cultural function.

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�Lack of infrastructure pegging India back�

GUWAHATI, Nov 4 - Lack of infrastructure, human resources and adequate amount of energy are the factors behind India lagging far behind the United States of America, Russia and China in matters of space research, especially research on Mars, the red planet which is now believed to contain water in the form of ice which indicated the existence of life.

This was the observation made by noted space scientist Prof Jitendra Nath Goswami, a top space scientist of the country and the brain behind Chandrayan-I, the first Indian mission to the Moon. He was delivering the 37th foundation day lecture of the Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology (IASST) here on Tuesday on space exploration with special focus on the Indian scene.

The information that Mars contains water in the form of ice has generated tremendous enthusiasm within the scientific community, because this indicates existence of life in the red planet, he said.

Prof Goswami, who spoke on the development of the space research activities in a chronological manner, said though India does not have infrastructure like high resolution sensors, full-fledged indigenous capacity sensors for probing the Moon and the Mars, it has been making efforts to develop such infrastructure.

Addressing a gathering of physicists, mathematicians, biological scientists, teachers and students of various institutions of higher education, he also informed that efforts are on to send the Chandrayan-II to the Moon. The Chandrayan-II will be an improved version of the Chandrayan-I, he said.

He exhorted the younger generation of the country to engage themselves honestly and in a dedicated manner in space research activities.

At the function, which was presided over by former Principal of Cotton College, Prof Anil Kumar Goswami, three scientists � Prof MK Chaudhuri, Vice-Chancellor of Tezpur University, Prof HP Barthakur, a former Professor and Head of the Department of Soil Science of the Assam Agricultural University and Prof CK Rajkonwar ex-Secretary, IASST and retired Professor and Head of the Department of Gynaecology, College of Veterinary Sciences were felicitated for their contributions to the IASST.

The felicitated scientists recollected their association with the IASST. Prof Chaudhuri specially recollected the memory of his involvement in the transition process of the IASST from a State Government institute to a Central Government one. He advised the students not be complacent with their present achievements. They should aspire for more, he said.

The Director of IASST, NC Talukdar welcomed the guests, while its Registrar, Dr Diganta Goswami offered the vote of thanks. The day-long programme concluded with a colourful cultural function.

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