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Jute tech use to help prevent soil erosion

By Staff Reporter
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GUWAHATI, Jan 6 � The perennial problem of soil erosion, landslides and short life span of roads due to incessant rains in Assam might find a natural solution if government agencies take a bold step to accept the new Jute Geo-Textile (JGT) technology.

The JGT, being aggressively pushed by the National Jute Board (NJB), is an emerging technology which has been proved as cheaper and much more environment friendly compared to synthetic geo-textile.

Although 170 trial projects were successfully undertaken in 22 States by two Central government and 19 State government agencies so far, no State except for West Bengal has shown practical interest in promoting jute in a big way.

The Government of West Bengal, which contributes 70 per cent of total jute production in the country, has already included JGT in its �rate list� allowing it to be used in relevant construction work and also in the process of making its use mandatory for construction of PMGSY and other rural roads in the State.

As a trial project, JGT was used in constructing a 7 km-long road in Tripura, among 170 projects, in very few other States in the country.

The Border Roads Organisation has successfully used JGT in slope management work in the landslide-prone Sonapur area along NH-44 besides a few other north-eastern States, such as Arunachal, Manipur and Nagaland.

Besides, NF Railway has procured 80,000 square meters of JGT to be used alongside the erosion-prone portions of railway tracks in the region, including in Garo Hills, said Subrata Gupta, Jute�Commissioner of NJB.

Next to West Bengal, Assam is the biggest jute producer in the country, although there are very few jute mills in the State, which produce bags and other materials. But it is yet to start JGT production.

The workshop on JGT was held with the objective of sensitizing the State government departments about the need for using environment friendly and cost effective technology.

Use of JGT also allows the need for a thinner layer of concrete materials to build a road compared to that without JGT, which ultimately reduces the cost.

The NJB will hold discussions with the authorities in Assam so as to explore the possibility of use of JGT in controlling erosion by mighty Brahmaputra and other rivers, a perennial problem, in the State.

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Jute tech use to help prevent soil erosion

GUWAHATI, Jan 6 � The perennial problem of soil erosion, landslides and short life span of roads due to incessant rains in Assam might find a natural solution if government agencies take a bold step to accept the new Jute Geo-Textile (JGT) technology.

The JGT, being aggressively pushed by the National Jute Board (NJB), is an emerging technology which has been proved as cheaper and much more environment friendly compared to synthetic geo-textile.

Although 170 trial projects were successfully undertaken in 22 States by two Central government and 19 State government agencies so far, no State except for West Bengal has shown practical interest in promoting jute in a big way.

The Government of West Bengal, which contributes 70 per cent of total jute production in the country, has already included JGT in its �rate list� allowing it to be used in relevant construction work and also in the process of making its use mandatory for construction of PMGSY and other rural roads in the State.

As a trial project, JGT was used in constructing a 7 km-long road in Tripura, among 170 projects, in very few other States in the country.

The Border Roads Organisation has successfully used JGT in slope management work in the landslide-prone Sonapur area along NH-44 besides a few other north-eastern States, such as Arunachal, Manipur and Nagaland.

Besides, NF Railway has procured 80,000 square meters of JGT to be used alongside the erosion-prone portions of railway tracks in the region, including in Garo Hills, said Subrata Gupta, Jute�Commissioner of NJB.

Next to West Bengal, Assam is the biggest jute producer in the country, although there are very few jute mills in the State, which produce bags and other materials. But it is yet to start JGT production.

The workshop on JGT was held with the objective of sensitizing the State government departments about the need for using environment friendly and cost effective technology.

Use of JGT also allows the need for a thinner layer of concrete materials to build a road compared to that without JGT, which ultimately reduces the cost.

The NJB will hold discussions with the authorities in Assam so as to explore the possibility of use of JGT in controlling erosion by mighty Brahmaputra and other rivers, a perennial problem, in the State.