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Journalist, literary pensioners feted

By STAFF REPORTER
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GUWAHATI, Aug 29 - The role of great Assamese writers like Lakshminath Bezbaroa, Padmanath Gohain Baruah, Hemchandra Goswami and Chandra Kumar Agarwala and succeeded by the next generation of brilliant writers like Syed Abdul Malik, Birinchi Kumar Baruah, Dimbeswar Neog, Maheswar Neog, Saurabh Chaliha, Dr Bhabendra Nath Saikia, Nalinibala Devi, Nirmal Prabha Bardoloi and Mamoni Raisam Goswami in emblazoning the pages of history of Assamese literature right from the latter two decades of the 19th century till the advent of the post-modern era was discussed by several speakers at a function held on the occasion of the felicitation of journalists and writers who had been awarded journalist and literary pensions by the Government of Assam this year.

Inaugurating the function, Kanak Chandra Sarma, former vice-president of the Asam Sahitya Sabha recalled the great contributions of the apex literary body in generating mass awareness about the significance and value of literature.

Chief guest Dr Bijoy Krishna Deva Sarma stressed the need for correctness of and the use of appropriate words in modern writing in order to acquaint the new generation with the beauty and appeal of the Assamese language.

Presiding over the meeting, senior journalist DN Chakravartty said few languages of the world could rival the Assamese language in the matter of its beauty and the melody of its expressions. He said although illiterate, an average Assamese villager can prove himself to be the most cultured among the average cultured citizens � both of the West and the Orient.

He also dwelt on the richness of the Assamese vocabulary which he said did not have any parallel among the languages of the world in respect of expressing relationships and voicing agonies of suffering.

Writer Riju Hazarika, in his inimitable style, regaled the audience with his humorous expressions concerning the day-to-day life of an average modern Assamese. He said amidst the gloom of suffering, corruption and violence, it is literature, especially poetry and short story, from which man can seek salvation from mental suffering.

Tabiul Hussain said modern writers should set before the general masses ideals and greatness of noble thoughts, he added. Haren Kalita and Neelima Chakravarty, both recipients of literary pension this year, said the award had imposed new responsibilities on them and they would try to contribute their mite to the enrichment of Assamese literature.

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Journalist, literary pensioners feted

GUWAHATI, Aug 29 - The role of great Assamese writers like Lakshminath Bezbaroa, Padmanath Gohain Baruah, Hemchandra Goswami and Chandra Kumar Agarwala and succeeded by the next generation of brilliant writers like Syed Abdul Malik, Birinchi Kumar Baruah, Dimbeswar Neog, Maheswar Neog, Saurabh Chaliha, Dr Bhabendra Nath Saikia, Nalinibala Devi, Nirmal Prabha Bardoloi and Mamoni Raisam Goswami in emblazoning the pages of history of Assamese literature right from the latter two decades of the 19th century till the advent of the post-modern era was discussed by several speakers at a function held on the occasion of the felicitation of journalists and writers who had been awarded journalist and literary pensions by the Government of Assam this year.

Inaugurating the function, Kanak Chandra Sarma, former vice-president of the Asam Sahitya Sabha recalled the great contributions of the apex literary body in generating mass awareness about the significance and value of literature.

Chief guest Dr Bijoy Krishna Deva Sarma stressed the need for correctness of and the use of appropriate words in modern writing in order to acquaint the new generation with the beauty and appeal of the Assamese language.

Presiding over the meeting, senior journalist DN Chakravartty said few languages of the world could rival the Assamese language in the matter of its beauty and the melody of its expressions. He said although illiterate, an average Assamese villager can prove himself to be the most cultured among the average cultured citizens � both of the West and the Orient.

He also dwelt on the richness of the Assamese vocabulary which he said did not have any parallel among the languages of the world in respect of expressing relationships and voicing agonies of suffering.

Writer Riju Hazarika, in his inimitable style, regaled the audience with his humorous expressions concerning the day-to-day life of an average modern Assamese. He said amidst the gloom of suffering, corruption and violence, it is literature, especially poetry and short story, from which man can seek salvation from mental suffering.

Tabiul Hussain said modern writers should set before the general masses ideals and greatness of noble thoughts, he added. Haren Kalita and Neelima Chakravarty, both recipients of literary pension this year, said the award had imposed new responsibilities on them and they would try to contribute their mite to the enrichment of Assamese literature.

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