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Farmer generates forests on sandy land

By Gunadhar Doley
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SILAPATHAR, Sept 21 � Kanak Morang of Rekhachapari village has tried hard to generate forests in 32 bighas of land with different varieties of local trees in the last 14 years. Morang has planted commercially important trees like Himu, Ejar, Sesu, Gamari, Segun and other varieties. He is now trying to generate forests in another 18 bighas of land. His forest came to light when flood created havoc in Rekhachapari area of Sissi revenue block under Dhemaji district this year.

In the recent floods, the surging waters of the Brahmaputra washed away the Sonari-Dismur embankment at Rekhachapari. The flood also washed away 40 dwelling houses and Rekhachapari LP School, but Morang�s dwelling house remained safe even though it was only 50 metres away from the embankment. He said that though water entered his house, it remained safe. Nearly 50 trees fell down which will be replaced shortly, he said.

He turned to planting trees after facing massive floods in the area on several occasions earlier. The family had to face huge devastation in 1987. That year, floods turned his cultivable land into sand. In 2000, flood water washed away his dwelling houses. After shifting his home, he engaged himself in planting trees on his sandy land. He learned plantation and preparation of saplings from his father.

His father, Umakanta Morang had served as a forest guard under the State Government. After Umakanta retired in 1992, he came back to his village, but passed away in 1999. After his father died, Kanak thought of reviving his father�s love towards nature. In the last 14 years, he has turned 32 bighas of land into forest. This year, floods deposited two-three feet of sand on 12 bighas of his land ,which is nearly 50 metres away from the breached area. Trees will be planted shortly there, Kanak said.

Kanak runs his family by selling fruit saplings, vegetables and poultry products. He teaches children the preparation of saplings. During the months of April and May, migratory birds visit the Morang Forestry.

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Farmer generates forests on sandy land

SILAPATHAR, Sept 21 � Kanak Morang of Rekhachapari village has tried hard to generate forests in 32 bighas of land with different varieties of local trees in the last 14 years. Morang has planted commercially important trees like Himu, Ejar, Sesu, Gamari, Segun and other varieties. He is now trying to generate forests in another 18 bighas of land. His forest came to light when flood created havoc in Rekhachapari area of Sissi revenue block under Dhemaji district this year.

In the recent floods, the surging waters of the Brahmaputra washed away the Sonari-Dismur embankment at Rekhachapari. The flood also washed away 40 dwelling houses and Rekhachapari LP School, but Morang�s dwelling house remained safe even though it was only 50 metres away from the embankment. He said that though water entered his house, it remained safe. Nearly 50 trees fell down which will be replaced shortly, he said.

He turned to planting trees after facing massive floods in the area on several occasions earlier. The family had to face huge devastation in 1987. That year, floods turned his cultivable land into sand. In 2000, flood water washed away his dwelling houses. After shifting his home, he engaged himself in planting trees on his sandy land. He learned plantation and preparation of saplings from his father.

His father, Umakanta Morang had served as a forest guard under the State Government. After Umakanta retired in 1992, he came back to his village, but passed away in 1999. After his father died, Kanak thought of reviving his father�s love towards nature. In the last 14 years, he has turned 32 bighas of land into forest. This year, floods deposited two-three feet of sand on 12 bighas of his land ,which is nearly 50 metres away from the breached area. Trees will be planted shortly there, Kanak said.

Kanak runs his family by selling fruit saplings, vegetables and poultry products. He teaches children the preparation of saplings. During the months of April and May, migratory birds visit the Morang Forestry.

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