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Exhibition on pre-Ahom cultural assimilation

By The Assam Tribune
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GUWAHATI, July 30 - The Assam State Museum, under the State Directorate of Museums, in collaboration with the India Foundation for the Arts (IFA), Bangalore, is organising an exhibition on the theme �Mysterious Mothers of the Museum� in the Museum premises from August 1 to 10. Shubhasree Purkayastha, Museum and Archival Research Fellow, IFA, will be the curator.

The exhibition will select four objects from the museum and attempt to re-contextualise them by providing an alternative identification. The objects were an integral part of an early �Matrika� series, and their worship and creation were influenced by the larger wave of Hinduism coming in from the northern India, stated a press release issued by the Director of Museums, Assam.

From the sixth century onwards, the Sankritising elements from the Brahmanic north interacted with the indigenous cultures of ancient Kamrup, leading to a unique historical narrative and a distinct socio-cultural understanding. This is reflected in the economic and political history of the State as well as in its rich artistic legacy.

The exhibition would be accompanied by a workshop for school students on August 5 and an expert talk on the history of the pre-Ahom Assam on August 10.

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Exhibition on pre-Ahom cultural assimilation

GUWAHATI, July 30 - The Assam State Museum, under the State Directorate of Museums, in collaboration with the India Foundation for the Arts (IFA), Bangalore, is organising an exhibition on the theme �Mysterious Mothers of the Museum� in the Museum premises from August 1 to 10. Shubhasree Purkayastha, Museum and Archival Research Fellow, IFA, will be the curator.

The exhibition will select four objects from the museum and attempt to re-contextualise them by providing an alternative identification. The objects were an integral part of an early �Matrika� series, and their worship and creation were influenced by the larger wave of Hinduism coming in from the northern India, stated a press release issued by the Director of Museums, Assam.

From the sixth century onwards, the Sankritising elements from the Brahmanic north interacted with the indigenous cultures of ancient Kamrup, leading to a unique historical narrative and a distinct socio-cultural understanding. This is reflected in the economic and political history of the State as well as in its rich artistic legacy.

The exhibition would be accompanied by a workshop for school students on August 5 and an expert talk on the history of the pre-Ahom Assam on August 10.