Begin typing your search above and press return to search.

Community participation MSW disposal stressed

By MAMATA MISHRA
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo

GUWAHATI, Nov 17 � With segregation of municipal waste as the main mantra to realize the dream of a clean Guwahati, the Guwahati Municipal Corporation (GMC) is anticipating community participation in turning garbage into money.

The Corporation, which has already started working on introducing the mechanism of dry and wet waste segregation at households and treatment of both types of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) at ward level, would now approach the big apartments and Nagarik Samitis (local citizens� committees at ward, locality, etc) for a proactive role in turning the kitchen waste into organic manure for home-grown plants, etc.

�With the latest technology available for recycling of dry waste and composting of wet waste, it is possible to turn garbage into money. We appeal to the community, large apartments with 50 households, or the Nagarik Samitis to take the lead in installing compost units for wet waste. The Corporation is ready to do the necessary handholding and we would also provide incentives and up to 20 per cent subsidy on the project,� GMC Commissioner S Viswanathan told The Assam Tribune.

�The installation cost of a non-electrical kitchen waste compost unit is merely Rs 1 lakh and it turns wet waste in to organic manure in 20 days. Minus any foul smell, this manure could be used for flower pots, kitchen gardens or rooftop gardens. The electricity operated units, on the other hand, would give faster results but the project cost would be around Rs 5 lakh. We are planning to start this project on a pilot basis at one or two localities which could be emulated by others as well,� he added.

A strong need is being felt to adopt a multifaceted approach for managing MSW, a common problem in the urban areas of the country. Recently, a division bench of the Karnataka High Court directed the Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) to segregate the dry and wet municipal wastes at source in all the wards of Bengaluru.

�Since segregation of dry and solid wastes has been adopted countrywide as the most pragmatic way to get rid of the urban filth, we want Guwahati to be a pioneer in introducing this mechanism. Soon it would be made mandatory for every household to keep Blue and Green dustbins for dry and wet wastes respectively,� he added.

More in Entertainment
Next Story
Similar Posts
Community participation MSW disposal stressed

GUWAHATI, Nov 17 � With segregation of municipal waste as the main mantra to realize the dream of a clean Guwahati, the Guwahati Municipal Corporation (GMC) is anticipating community participation in turning garbage into money.

The Corporation, which has already started working on introducing the mechanism of dry and wet waste segregation at households and treatment of both types of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) at ward level, would now approach the big apartments and Nagarik Samitis (local citizens� committees at ward, locality, etc) for a proactive role in turning the kitchen waste into organic manure for home-grown plants, etc.

�With the latest technology available for recycling of dry waste and composting of wet waste, it is possible to turn garbage into money. We appeal to the community, large apartments with 50 households, or the Nagarik Samitis to take the lead in installing compost units for wet waste. The Corporation is ready to do the necessary handholding and we would also provide incentives and up to 20 per cent subsidy on the project,� GMC Commissioner S Viswanathan told The Assam Tribune.

�The installation cost of a non-electrical kitchen waste compost unit is merely Rs 1 lakh and it turns wet waste in to organic manure in 20 days. Minus any foul smell, this manure could be used for flower pots, kitchen gardens or rooftop gardens. The electricity operated units, on the other hand, would give faster results but the project cost would be around Rs 5 lakh. We are planning to start this project on a pilot basis at one or two localities which could be emulated by others as well,� he added.

A strong need is being felt to adopt a multifaceted approach for managing MSW, a common problem in the urban areas of the country. Recently, a division bench of the Karnataka High Court directed the Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) to segregate the dry and wet municipal wastes at source in all the wards of Bengaluru.

�Since segregation of dry and solid wastes has been adopted countrywide as the most pragmatic way to get rid of the urban filth, we want Guwahati to be a pioneer in introducing this mechanism. Soon it would be made mandatory for every household to keep Blue and Green dustbins for dry and wet wastes respectively,� he added.

More in Entertainment
Similar Posts