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Centre foresees no security threat from NE ultras� unity move

By R Dutta Choudhury
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GUWAHATI, May 3 � The Government of India is of the view that there would not be any serious security threat to the country even if the militant groups of North East, who have bases in Myanmar, join hands, and the security agencies are fully capable of handling such a situation.

Highly placed sources in the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) told The Assam Tribune that the security agencies were having inputs about attempts by the militant groups of North East to join hands and reportedly, the groups recently managed to set aside their differences to come to a common platform. Sources revealed that the militant groups, which would be part of the new platform, would include the Khaplang faction of the NSCN, the United Liberation Front of Asom (Independent), the Songbijit faction of the National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB) and a few groups from Manipur.

However, MHA sources played down the security threat that might be posed by the militant groups. Sources pointed out that coming together on a common platform would only give the militants a psychological advantage, but their striking power and capability to indulge in acts of violence to create disturbance in the region would not increase.

Most of the militant groups of the North East are based in Taga area of Myanmar and the Indian security agencies know their strengths and weaknesses. The militants have been staying in Taga together for the past decade or so. They stay together, eat together and sometimes train together. Merely joining hands on a common platform would not make any change in the security scenario of the North East, the MHA sources asserted. Earlier also, some of the militant groups had planned joint operations, but their move did not succeed.

Sources also pointed out that the strength of almost all the militant groups of the North East has dwindled. There has been a clear division in the ranks of the NSCN(K) on the issue of coming out of the ceasefire agreement with the Government. The ULFA(I) is in bad shape and despite repeated attempts, members of the outfit could not indulge in any major act of violence for sometime, while the NDFB(S) suffered badly in the major offensive launched by the police and security forces following the massacre of more than 70 persons by the outfit on December 23 last year. Under the circumstances, the outfits were forced to join hands for their own survival, sources pointed out.

MHA sources further said that the militants groups of the North East had earlier formed a joint platform called Indo Burma Revolutionary Front and at that time, all the outfits were at their peak. But even that effort failed and the Front later disintegrated.

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Centre foresees no security threat from NE ultras� unity move

GUWAHATI, May 3 � The Government of India is of the view that there would not be any serious security threat to the country even if the militant groups of North East, who have bases in Myanmar, join hands, and the security agencies are fully capable of handling such a situation.

Highly placed sources in the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) told The Assam Tribune that the security agencies were having inputs about attempts by the militant groups of North East to join hands and reportedly, the groups recently managed to set aside their differences to come to a common platform. Sources revealed that the militant groups, which would be part of the new platform, would include the Khaplang faction of the NSCN, the United Liberation Front of Asom (Independent), the Songbijit faction of the National Democratic Front of Boroland (NDFB) and a few groups from Manipur.

However, MHA sources played down the security threat that might be posed by the militant groups. Sources pointed out that coming together on a common platform would only give the militants a psychological advantage, but their striking power and capability to indulge in acts of violence to create disturbance in the region would not increase.

Most of the militant groups of the North East are based in Taga area of Myanmar and the Indian security agencies know their strengths and weaknesses. The militants have been staying in Taga together for the past decade or so. They stay together, eat together and sometimes train together. Merely joining hands on a common platform would not make any change in the security scenario of the North East, the MHA sources asserted. Earlier also, some of the militant groups had planned joint operations, but their move did not succeed.

Sources also pointed out that the strength of almost all the militant groups of the North East has dwindled. There has been a clear division in the ranks of the NSCN(K) on the issue of coming out of the ceasefire agreement with the Government. The ULFA(I) is in bad shape and despite repeated attempts, members of the outfit could not indulge in any major act of violence for sometime, while the NDFB(S) suffered badly in the major offensive launched by the police and security forces following the massacre of more than 70 persons by the outfit on December 23 last year. Under the circumstances, the outfits were forced to join hands for their own survival, sources pointed out.

MHA sources further said that the militants groups of the North East had earlier formed a joint platform called Indo Burma Revolutionary Front and at that time, all the outfits were at their peak. But even that effort failed and the Front later disintegrated.

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