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�19th century Assamese literature is the doorway to modern Assamese studies�

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TEZPUR, June 10 - The Centre for Assamese Studies (CAS), of Tezpur University organised a glittering programme on the occasion of its seventh foundation day. The programme began with an invocation of Byasgowa Ojapali performed by Dr Lopa Das, a research scholar of the department and her group.

A talk entitled, �A century of Assamese Studies� was organised on the occasion. Prof Ranjit Kr Dev Goswami, noted academician and former Srimanta Sankardeva Chair professor & Head, CAS briefly narrated how Assamese was first studied in Calcutta University in 1919, as there was no higher learning institution in Assam at that time.

�Thanks to Sir Asutosh Mookerjee, (the prolific Bengali educator and second Indian Vice-Chancellor of the University of Calcutta), who had envisioned the study of multiple literatures in colonial India as a means of bridging the differences among languages, identities, people, the Department of Indian Languages began at the Calcutta University in 1919, where Assamese was also being studied, Prof Goswami said. Later, when Cotton College was established in 1901 and Gauhati University in 1948, the study shifted from Calcutta to Assam, he further added.

Revisiting the 19th century Assamese studies, Prof Goswami emphasised that although the 19th century Assamese studies is must for understanding modern Assamese studies, the significance of the 17th and 18th centuries is equally important. �Studying 19th century literature is the doorway to the modern Assamese studies, but the 19th century is incomplete without studying the 18th century� Prof Goswami observed. Prof Goswami, a noted linguist also elaborated on what exactly is �Assamese Studies�. Assamese Studies is the study of �Bhasha (language), Sanskriti (Tradition) and Sahitya (Literature)�, he said.

Advising the young faculty members and researchers, Prof Goswami said that �One needs to learn at least English and Sanskrit before venturing into the world of Assamese Studies. A few more language skills is an additional asset� he added.

Speaking on the occasion, Prof Jain, VC, Tezpur University, particularly mentioned Dr Bhabendra Nath Saikia�s contribution to the Assamese society and praised him as a multidimensional and versatile person modelled into one. He was an artiste, writer, film maker and poet�, he said. Prof Jain also said that all efforts would be given to transform the Centre into a Department.

A novel Kocharethi: the araya woman, written by Malayalam writer Narayan translated into Assamese by Dr Juri Dutta, Assistant Professor, CAS was also released on the occasion. The original Malayalam novel was published in 1998. The same was translated into English by Catharine Thankamma and published by Oxford University Press in 2011. An art exhibition of Siddhant Medhi, Research Scholar, CAS, which wasalso exhibited at the venue.

The programme was attended by Prof Madan M Sarma, Senior faculty member, Department of English & Foreign Languages, Prof PK Das, Dean, Humanities & Social Sciences, Dr Satish Ch Bhattacharya, noted academician, apart from faculty members and staff of the University.

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�19th century Assamese literature is the doorway to modern Assamese studies�

TEZPUR, June 10 - The Centre for Assamese Studies (CAS), of Tezpur University organised a glittering programme on the occasion of its seventh foundation day. The programme began with an invocation of Byasgowa Ojapali performed by Dr Lopa Das, a research scholar of the department and her group.

A talk entitled, �A century of Assamese Studies� was organised on the occasion. Prof Ranjit Kr Dev Goswami, noted academician and former Srimanta Sankardeva Chair professor & Head, CAS briefly narrated how Assamese was first studied in Calcutta University in 1919, as there was no higher learning institution in Assam at that time.

�Thanks to Sir Asutosh Mookerjee, (the prolific Bengali educator and second Indian Vice-Chancellor of the University of Calcutta), who had envisioned the study of multiple literatures in colonial India as a means of bridging the differences among languages, identities, people, the Department of Indian Languages began at the Calcutta University in 1919, where Assamese was also being studied, Prof Goswami said. Later, when Cotton College was established in 1901 and Gauhati University in 1948, the study shifted from Calcutta to Assam, he further added.

Revisiting the 19th century Assamese studies, Prof Goswami emphasised that although the 19th century Assamese studies is must for understanding modern Assamese studies, the significance of the 17th and 18th centuries is equally important. �Studying 19th century literature is the doorway to the modern Assamese studies, but the 19th century is incomplete without studying the 18th century� Prof Goswami observed. Prof Goswami, a noted linguist also elaborated on what exactly is �Assamese Studies�. Assamese Studies is the study of �Bhasha (language), Sanskriti (Tradition) and Sahitya (Literature)�, he said.

Advising the young faculty members and researchers, Prof Goswami said that �One needs to learn at least English and Sanskrit before venturing into the world of Assamese Studies. A few more language skills is an additional asset� he added.

Speaking on the occasion, Prof Jain, VC, Tezpur University, particularly mentioned Dr Bhabendra Nath Saikia�s contribution to the Assamese society and praised him as a multidimensional and versatile person modelled into one. He was an artiste, writer, film maker and poet�, he said. Prof Jain also said that all efforts would be given to transform the Centre into a Department.

A novel Kocharethi: the araya woman, written by Malayalam writer Narayan translated into Assamese by Dr Juri Dutta, Assistant Professor, CAS was also released on the occasion. The original Malayalam novel was published in 1998. The same was translated into English by Catharine Thankamma and published by Oxford University Press in 2011. An art exhibition of Siddhant Medhi, Research Scholar, CAS, which wasalso exhibited at the venue.

The programme was attended by Prof Madan M Sarma, Senior faculty member, Department of English & Foreign Languages, Prof PK Das, Dean, Humanities & Social Sciences, Dr Satish Ch Bhattacharya, noted academician, apart from faculty members and staff of the University.

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